Monthly Archives: June 2013

Myths About Gum Disease

Myths About Gum Disease

Gum disease is an infection of the tissues that surround and support your teeth. It is a major cause of tooth loss in adults. Because gum disease is usually painless, you may not know you have it.

gum-disease

MYTH #1: Gum disease is not that common.

On the contrary, gum disease is extremely common, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which notes nearly half of adults over age 30 suffer from some form of gum disease. Gum disease, an infection of the tissues that surround and support your teeth, is caused by plaque, the sticky film of bacteria that is constantly forming on our teeth. Plaque that is not removed with thorough daily brushing and cleaning between teeth can eventually harden into calculus or tartar.

MYTH #2: I don’t have any cavities so I can’t have gum disease.

Being cavity-free doesn’t ensure you are in the clear where gum disease is concerned. That’s because gum disease is painless and many people have no idea they have it. Gums that bleed easily or are red, swollen or tender is a sign of gingivitis, the earliest stage of gum disease and the only stage that is reversible. When caught early gingivitis can usually be eliminated by a professional cleaning at the dental office, followed by daily brushing and flossing.

MYTH #3: Having gum disease means I’m going to lose my teeth, right?

Not so! You don’t have to lose any of your teeth to gum disease if you practice good oral hygiene. That means brushing your teeth twice a day, cleaning between your teeth daily, eating a healthy diet, and scheduling regular dental visits. Even if you are diagnosed with gum disease, your dentist can design a treatment plan to help you keep it under control.

MYTH #4: Bleeding gums during pregnancy is normal.

While it’s true that some women develop a condition known as “pregnancy gingivitis,” it’s not true that everyone experiences this. You can help prevent this condition by taking extra care during your brushing and flossing routine. Your dentist may recommend more frequent cleanings to prevent this.

MYTH #5: Everyone has bad breath sometimes. It doesn’t mean they have gum disease.

Persistent bad breath or a bad taste in your mouth can be an indicator of gum disease and other oral diseases so it is important that you uncover what’s causing the problem. If constantly have bad breath, make an appointment to see your dentist. Regular checkups allow your dentist to detect any problems as your bad breath may be the sign of a medical disorder. If your dentist determines that your mouth is healthy, you may be referred to your primary care physician.

MYTH #6: I have diabetes. Does that mean I will get gum disease?

Diabetes is a chronic disease which affects your body’s ability to process sugar. The resulting high blood sugar can cause problems with your eyes, nerves, kidneys, heart and other parts of your body. Diabetes can also lower your resistance to infection and can slow the healing process. If you have diabetes, you are at greater risk of developing some oral health problems, including gum disease, so it’s important that you are extra diligent with your oral health. Always brush your teeth twice a day for two minutes with fluoride toothpaste, floss daily, and see your dentist regularly.

For more info visit http://www.mouthhealthy.org

For any oral health concerns Contact Glasscock Dental

8430 Univ. Exec. Park Drive Suite 610 Charlotte, NC 28262

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Holy Basil- Can it help your Oral Health?

Want to improve your oral health?  Try adding some Holy Basil Tea in your diet!

holy basil

Holy Basil is very useful in taking care of your teeth.  This herb can be used to maintain dental health by counteracting bad breath,  destroying 99% of germs and bacteria in the mouth and this effect last for a long time. Holy Basil can also be used to treat ulcers in your mouth.

 

 

Cosmetic Dentistry- Is it worth the cost?

cosmetic dentistry

  • 63% – Percentage of people who say they look best in photos when they are showing their teeth.
  • 99.7% – Percentage of adults who say an attractive smile is an important personal asset.
  • 74% – Percentage of people who say that an unattractive smile can hurt a person’s chances for business or career success.
  • 23% – Percentage of people who say they look the best with their mouth closed.

Statistics prove over and over again that a healthy, beautiful smile is important to the success of your life. Some people underestimate the power of a beautiful smile and perfect teeth. That is why they don’t invest much on their dental treatments. They think that visiting a dentist is the last thing that they should do.  The office of Dr. David M. Glasscock DDS is here to tell you they are wrong.

Statistics tells us over and over again that your smile is the most important asset you  own.  It helps you get a job, makes you attractive to the opposite sex, and even helps you in establishing friendships.  Why wouldn’t you want to invest time and effort into something that provides you so much help in your life?

Some of us are just not blessed with the prefect smile.  We might need a little help.  Thankfully we live in a time where technology can fix the imperfections we were given.  Do to the advancements  in dental health, we can correct almost any problem.

Is cosmetic dentistry expensive? It can be.  It really depends on what needs to be done to determine the cost of treatment.

Is it worth the investment?  YES

Why is it worth it?  Having an attractive smile will help you live your life to its potential.  Do you want to be held back because of bad teeth? The investment of a healthy smile will improve your  overall health, your confidence and attractiveness to the people around you. 

Call the office of Dr. David M. Glasscock DDS.  We provide all aspects of Cosmetic Dentistry to the people of Charlotte and surrounding areas of NC.  Our goal is to provide you the most comprehensive treatment at a fair and reasonable price.  We want to make you smile!

Payment plans are available.

 

Mouth Healthy Over 60

60 AND OVER

Just 60 years ago, it was an assumption that as we age we would lose our natural teeth. But, that’s not the case for today’s older adults who are keeping their natural teeth longer than ever before. A healthy mouth and teeth help you look good, eat delicious and nutritious foods, and speak clearly and confidently.

Your mouth is the gateway to your body

Maintaining good oral health habits now is especially important because unhealthy bacteria in the mouth not only can harm your teeth and gums but may be associated with serious medical conditions. Research has shown that infections in the mouth may be associated with heart disease, stroke, diabetes, pneumonia and other health problems that are common in older adults. It really only takes a few simple steps, brushing and flossing daily, visiting your dentist regularly and eating nutritious foods to be Mouth Healthy for Life.

Image of electric toothbrush

 

Brush and Floss Daily  

Brushing and flossing your teeth is just as important for you as it is for your grandchildren. Even though it may have been years since you’ve had a cavity, your risk of cavities increases with age. One of the reasons is dry mouth—a common side effect of many prescription medications.

Brush your teeth twice a day with fluoride toothpaste. Choose a toothbrush with soft bristles and a small head to get to those hard to reach areas. Replace your toothbrush every three or four months, or sooner if the bristles becomes frayed. If you have arthritis or other condition that limits movement, try an electric toothbrush.

Clean between teeth daily with floss. If floss is too difficult to work with, try a floss pick or tiny brushes made specifically to clean between teeth.

Visit a Dentist Regularly  

Get regular dental checkups at least once a year – please do not wait until you have pain. Why? As you age, the nerves inside your teeth become smaller and less sensitive. By the time you feel pain from a cavity, it may be too late and you may lose your tooth. There are also more serious conditions that your dentist will look for, like oral cancer and gum disease, which do not always cause pain until the advanced stages of the disease. By then, it’s more difficult and costly to treat.

For more information visit http://www.mouthhealthy.org

For any oral health concerns Contact Glasscock Dental

8430 Univ. Exec. Park Drive Suite 610 Charlotte, NC 28262

Cut The Cheese for Healthy Teeth

Consuming dairy products is vital to maintaining good overall health, and it’s especially important to bone health. But there has been little research about how dairy products affect oral health in particular. However, according to a new study published in the May/June 2013 issue of General Dentistry, the peer-reviewed clinical journal of the Academy of General Dentistry (AGD), consuming cheese and other dairy products may help protect teeth against cavities.

cheeses

The study sampled 68 subjects ranging in age from 12 to 15, and the authors looked at the dental plaque pH in the subjects’ mouths before and after they consumed cheese, milk, or sugar-free yogurt. A pH level lower than 5.5 puts a person at risk for tooth erosion, which is a process that wears away the enamel (or protective outside layer) of teeth. “The higher the pH level is above 5.5, the lower the chance of developing cavities,” explains Vipul Yadav, MDS, lead author of the study.

The subjects were assigned into groups randomly. Researchers instructed the first group to eat cheddar cheese, the second group to drink milk, and the third group to eat sugar-free yogurt. Each group consumed their product for three minutes and then swished with water. Researchers measured the pH level of each subject’s mouth at 10, 20, and 30 minutes after consumption.

The groups who consumed milk and sugar-free yogurt experienced no changes in the pH levels in their mouths. Subjects who ate cheese, however, showed a rapid increase in pH levels at each time interval, suggesting that cheese has anti-cavity properties.

The study indicated that the rising pH levels from eating cheese may have occurred due to increased saliva production (the mouth’s natural way to maintain a baseline acidity level), which could be caused by the action of chewing. Additionally, various compounds found in cheese may adhere to tooth enamel and help further protect teeth from acid.

“It looks like dairy does the mouth good,” says AGD spokesperson Seung-Hee Rhee, DDS, FAGD. “Not only are dairy products a healthy alternative to carb- or sugar-filled snacks, they also may be considered as a preventive measure against cavities.”

For any oral health concerns Contact Glasscock Dental

8430 Univ. Exec. Park Drive Suite 610 Charlotte, NC 28262