What Impact Does Alcohol Have on Your Teeth?

Beer

 

Have you ever heard how good that ice cold beer taste on a hot summer day? That one beer is not the issue.  So enjoy!  However, having multiple beers becomes a problem for your teeth as well as other vital organs inside your body.  Moderate alcohol consumption can co-exist in a healthy person’s lifestyle.  In spite of that, alcohol consumption is typically not considered healthy.

Alcohol’s Affect on your Teeth

The American Dental Association (ADA) warns that one of the side effects of alcohol can be just as damaging to your teeth: dehydration. Alcohol consumption leads to a decrease in saliva flow, so instead of being washed away naturally, bacteria clings to the enamel and increases your risk of tooth decay.

What About the Teeth?

If you have a preference for mixing liquor with dark sodas or drinking red wine, say goodbye to a white smile.
Timothy Chase, D.M.D.

People who suffer from alcohol dependency tend to have higher plaque levels on their teeth and are three times as likely to suffer from permanent tooth loss.

But are moderate drinkers at risk for serious tooth and mouth disease? There isn’t much conclusive medical evidence, but dentists say that they see the effects of moderate drinking regularly.

 

Staining

“The color in beverages comes from chromogens,” explains Dr. John Grbic, director of oral biology and clinical research in dentistry at Columbia’s College of Dental Medicine. Chromogens attach to tooth enamel that’s been compromised by the acid in alcohol, and stain teeth. One way to bypass this is to drink alcoholic drinks with a straw.

“If you have a preference for mixing liquor with dark sodas or drinking red wine, say goodbye to a white smile,” says Dr. Timothy Chase, D.M.D., of SmilesNY. “Aside from the sugar content, dark colored soft drinks can stain or discolor the teeth. Remember to rinse your mouth with water between drinks.”

Beer is only marginally better, according to Dr. Joseph Banker, D.M.D., of Creative Dental. “Beer is acidic just like wine. That makes teeth more likely to be stained by the dark barley and malts found in darker beers.”

Dryness

Dr. Banker also notes that drinks high in alcohol, like spirits, dry the mouth. Saliva keeps teeth moist and helps to remove plaque and bacteria from the tooth’s surface. Try to stay hydrated by drinking water while you drink alcohol.

Other Damage

What Is “Heavy Drinking”?
  • For women, more than 8 drinks per week
  • For men, more than 15 drinks per week
  • The CDC says moderate drinking is 1 a day for women, 2 a day for men

Tooth damage related to alcohol is increased if you chew the ice in your drinks, which can break your teeth, or if you add citrus to your beverage. The American Dental Association notes that even a squeeze of lemon provides enough acid to etch away at tooth enamel.

One study did conclude that red wine kills oral bacteria called streptococci, which is associated with tooth decay. Of course, you shouldn’t start drinking red wine just for that reason!

References:
Advertisements

Professional Teeth Whitening for Just $300

Teeth whitening

If you are looking to brighten your smile, take advantage of our limited time Teeth Whitening Special. Your smile is the first thing people notice when they see you. Show the world your brilliant smile!

 

In office teeth whitening treatment for just $300
Offer expires: 10/1/2018
* Some restrictions apply

July Vacation Schedule

vacation

My office will be closed on the following dates;

July 1st-July 12th

If you are having a true dental emergency while the office is closed, please contact Dr. Bullard’s office at 704-503-1800.

Also, administrative staff will be available part-time during these dates to schedule appointments or to answer any questions you may have while the office is closed.

Thank you,

Dr. David Glasscock

How do you prevent TMJ?

tmj

What is TMJ?

Feeling stressed out?  Your not alone.  A survey released on February 15, 2017 by the American Psychological Association reports that Americans say they’re feeling more stress than ever before.  Unfortunately, there is quite a down side to lot’s of stress.  It will ultimately affect your health in one form or another.  This stands true with dental issues as well.  TMJ problems are rising due to high stress levels in the world. TMJ or Temporomandibular Disorder is a condition that indicates the hinge connecting the upper and lower jaw isn’t working properly.

So what behaviors contribute to TMJ?

Many people who are stressed tend to develop some bad behaviors.  Biting on fingernails, pen caps, or the inside of your mouth can cause jaw pain. Other conditions such as when that feeling of anxiety kicks in, we find a cheesy pizza, bag of chips or even ice cream.  Let’s face it, there are many stress eaters out there.  Unfortunately, when “stressing out”, people tend to eat larger bites while eating.  To alleviate symptoms of TMJ, you need to avoid the behaviors.  Stop chewing on your nails, or pen.  While eating, take smaller bites.  You can also regularly massage your jaw, cheeks and temple muscles.

Another symptoms of TMJ is spasms. Most patients find heat is helpful in relieving pain and muscle tension.  This pain may radiate to your neck or shoulders. It can also cause ear pain, ringing the the ears and hearing loss.  Symptoms typically manifest when talking, yawning or chewing.  If symptoms occur, apply moist heat to the spasm area.  Also, try to maintain good sleep posture with neck support.  Good sleep posture is achieved when you maintain the curve in your lower back.  It is recommended that a person lye on their back with a pillow under their knees.  If that doesn’t work for you, try sleeping on your side with your knees slightly bent.

Another habit that adds to TMJ symptoms is teeth grinding.  Teeth grinding and clenching is a habit over time that will damage your teeth and will also add to TMJ symptoms.  The best way to resolve this issue is to see your dentist and ask about a night guard.  A night guard is a device that you where in your sleep and will prevent you from grinding.

Warning Signs of an Impacted Wisdom Tooth

impacted wisdom tooth

Somewhere between the ages of 18-24 your wisdom teeth begin to erupt.   Depending on how these teeth come in will depend if they need to be removed.  It’s not necessary for you to get your wisdom teeth removed if they are correctly positioned in your mouth and do not cause any pain or dental problems. However, 85 percent of adults have their wisdom teeth removed to protect their over all oral health.  Unfortunately, the eruption of wisdom teeth can be a painful experience that disrupts your daily life.

Common Symptoms of Impacted Wisdom Teeth

Swollen gums that are tender and bleeding

An impacted wisdom tooth can make your gums swollen and tender to the touch.  They may even start to bleed.  This can make brushing and flossing feel like an impossible task.  As other dental issues can create the same symptoms, it is important to make an appointment with your dentist to have the situation evaluated.

Swollen Glands

Many times swollen glands accompany impacted wisdom teeth.  Most times these glands are located in your shoulders and neck area.

Pain in the back of the mouth

An impacted tooth or teeth can cause you an immense amount of pain.  As the tooth or teeth that are impacted continue to try and erupt, your pain and symptoms can become worse.  The pain should be at its worse towards the back of the mouth but could in fact radiate down your jaw.  The best way to diagnose a suspected emerging wisdom tooth is to visit your dentist.

Swelling around jaw

With swelling of your gums, many times impacted wisdom teeth can cause your jaw to swell.  As the symptoms progress, your mouth may become difficult to open.

What happens if you ignore the problem?

I highly recommend that you do not ignore the problem.  When impacted wisdom teeth are not removed, there could be complications.  Impacted teeth can force other teeth out of place.  They also can cause infection.  Impacted wisdom teeth are prone to infection and decay so left untreated you could be looking at a serious problem down the line.

 

David M Glasscock DDS Family & Cosmetic Dentistry
8430 Univ. Exec. Park Drive Suite 610
Charlotte, NC 28262
Telephone:

704-510-1150

 Email:smile@glasscockdental.com

15% Off Teeth Whitening

glasscock-promotion

Request an Appointment

Dazzle your Valentine With Your Smile

Visit us to get your smile ready!

Book before the end of February

for 15% off teeth whitening!

request-appointment-button

We Will Be Open Monday

monday

Updated office schedule

The office of Dr. David Glasscock will resume regular schedule business hours starting on Monday January 9,2017

.

Thank you,
Dr. David Glasscock