Tag Archives: healthy

Is Popcorn the Best Choice for a Snack?

popcorn

 

Popcorn, Yumm!!!  Popcorn is that crunchy, buttery, salty snack that seems to be the perfect choice while watching TV or a movie.  The butter, salt and oil version might not be the healthiest choice but air popped popcorn is considered a healthy snack.  As perfect as this snack may seem, is it the best choice for your teeth and oral health?  This has been a long time debated topic.

Popcorn as a Healthy snack choice

Popcorn, minus all the butter and salt is loaded with antioxidants that help with cell damage.  Popcorn also provides calories, protein, vitamins and minerals that are good for your body.   As we all know, corn is one of the main food crops in most civilizations around the planet.

Popcorn Stuck in Teeth

 

But is popcorn good for your teeth? 

This is a debated question.  Popcorn provides nutrients that support your body. Anything that healthily supports the body is in fact good for your oral health. However, with this being said, you need to consider the flip side.  The sugar and carbohydrates in popcorn interact with your mouths bacteria creating acid that wears away your tooth enamel.  It is also a common occurrence for popcorn to become lodged under the gums or in between teeth while eating.  Without those small kernels being removed, this can cause pain, infection, abscesses and even contribute to tooth decay.

So, should you pick popcorn for your next snack?  That’s up to you to decide. But if you do, as with any snack, the office of Dr. David M Duncan, DDS recommends that you brush after eating.  With popcorn, we suggest you spend some time flossing to ensure the removal of kernels that might have become lodged while consuming.

8430 Univ. Exec. Park Drive Suite 610
Charlotte, NC 28262
Telephone:

704-510-1150

Fax:

704-510-1220

 

 

 

 

 

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Mouth Healthy Over 60

60 AND OVER

Just 60 years ago, it was an assumption that as we age we would lose our natural teeth. But, that’s not the case for today’s older adults who are keeping their natural teeth longer than ever before. A healthy mouth and teeth help you look good, eat delicious and nutritious foods, and speak clearly and confidently.

Your mouth is the gateway to your body

Maintaining good oral health habits now is especially important because unhealthy bacteria in the mouth not only can harm your teeth and gums but may be associated with serious medical conditions. Research has shown that infections in the mouth may be associated with heart disease, stroke, diabetes, pneumonia and other health problems that are common in older adults. It really only takes a few simple steps, brushing and flossing daily, visiting your dentist regularly and eating nutritious foods to be Mouth Healthy for Life.

Image of electric toothbrush

 

Brush and Floss Daily  

Brushing and flossing your teeth is just as important for you as it is for your grandchildren. Even though it may have been years since you’ve had a cavity, your risk of cavities increases with age. One of the reasons is dry mouth—a common side effect of many prescription medications.

Brush your teeth twice a day with fluoride toothpaste. Choose a toothbrush with soft bristles and a small head to get to those hard to reach areas. Replace your toothbrush every three or four months, or sooner if the bristles becomes frayed. If you have arthritis or other condition that limits movement, try an electric toothbrush.

Clean between teeth daily with floss. If floss is too difficult to work with, try a floss pick or tiny brushes made specifically to clean between teeth.

Visit a Dentist Regularly  

Get regular dental checkups at least once a year – please do not wait until you have pain. Why? As you age, the nerves inside your teeth become smaller and less sensitive. By the time you feel pain from a cavity, it may be too late and you may lose your tooth. There are also more serious conditions that your dentist will look for, like oral cancer and gum disease, which do not always cause pain until the advanced stages of the disease. By then, it’s more difficult and costly to treat.

For more information visit http://www.mouthhealthy.org

For any oral health concerns Contact Glasscock Dental

8430 Univ. Exec. Park Drive Suite 610 Charlotte, NC 28262

New Year and New Dental Tips for 2013

What’s your New Year’s resolution for 2013? You may be considering resolving to save money, get a better job or lose weight. Many people set new goals about having a healthier lifestyle in the new year. Why not make one of your New Year’s resolutions improving your dental health?january

Healthy resolutions can keep your teeth healthy, and any of the following changes will go a long way toward giving you a healthier smile for 2013:

Eat Plenty of Fruits and Vegetables

Eating well is important for your dental health. Poor nutrition can affect the entire immune system, increasing susceptibility to many common oral disorders, including gum (periodontal) disease. Antioxidants and other nutrients found in fruits, vegetables, legumes and nuts improve your body’s ability to fight bacteria and inflammation, helping to protect your teeth and gums. In addition, crisp fruits and raw vegetables like apples, carrots and celery help clean plaque from teeth and freshen breath.

Quit Smoking or Using Other Tobacco Products

Using tobacco can harm your mouth in a number of ways, increasing your risk for tooth discoloration, cavities, gum recession, gum disease and throat, lung and oral cancer. Smokers are about twice as likely to lose their teeth as non-smokers. It’s not just smoking tobacco that has negative effects on your oral health: use of smokeless tobacco can be just as harmful to your oral health. The good news is that the risk of tooth loss decreases after you quit smoking or using smokeless tobacco.

Limit Your Alcohol Intake

You may already know that excessive alcohol intake can have an effect on your overall health, but did you know that it may also affect your oral health? According to the Academy of General Dentistry, those who smoke, eat poorly and consume excessive alcohol also have increased gum recession (periodontal pocketing). Their studies show that smokers who regularly consume alcohol are less likely to brush their teeth on a regular basis and are less concerned about their basic health than nonsmokers.

Brush at Least Twice a Day and Floss at Least Once a Day

Brushing and flossing protect your teeth from decay and gum disease, which is caused by your teeth’s most persistent enemy, plaque – a sticky, colorless, invisible film of harmful bacteria that builds up on your teeth every day. Both brushing and flossing are equally important for good oral health: according to the Academy of General Dentistry, only flossing can remove plaque from between teeth and below the gumline, where decay and gum disease often begins.

Without proper brushing and flossing, you may develop bleeding gums, which may worsen to severely swollen, red, bleeding gums (gingivitis) and, eventually, gum disease. Because diseases of the mouth can affect the rest of your body, it is especially important to maintain good oral health.

See Your Dentist for Regular Checkups

By seeing your dentist at least twice a year, you can help prevent any dental health problems before they cause discomfort or require more comprehensive or expensive treatment. Regular visits allow your dentist to monitor your oral health and recommend a dental health regimen to address areas of concern.

In 2013, resolve to treat your mouth right: improve your diet, quit smoking and improve your oral hygiene habits – your teeth and your body will thank you for it!