Tag Archives: gum disease

What Will Happen If I Don’t Treat My Periodontal Disease?

Periodontal DiseaseWhat Will Happen If I Don’t Treat My Periodontal Disease?

The prognosis for untreated Periodontal Disease does not have the best outcome. Periodontal Disease not only can affect your teeth and gums but research has found it can affect your overall health as well.  As for your teeth, the beginning stages can cause painful chewing, bleeding gums and bad breath.  Most people believe that if they don’t treat their Periodontal Disease, losing some teeth and having difficulty eating  steak or corn on the cob would be their worst problem. However, that is far from the truth of what this untreated bacterial infection can do to you.  As medicine continues to advance, scientist continue to find supporting evidence of the association between periodontal disease and systemic conditions.  These conditions reach far beyond your teeth and can affect your health in a negative way.

Conditions Such As:

  • cardiovascular disease (heart attack/stroke)
  • type 2 diabetes
  • adverse pregnancy outcomes
  • chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
  • pneumonia
  • chronic kidney disease
  • rheumatoid arthritis
  • cognitive impairment
  • obesity
  • metabolic syndrome
  • cancer

What is Periodontal Disease?

Periodontal Disease is a bacterial infection under your gums.  As with most infections, if you don’t treat it, it will only get worse.  This infection works by breaking down your gums and detaching your gums from your teeth. Over time, once this infection has progressed and has gone untreated, tooth loss will be imminent.

Signs of Periodontal Disease

  • Bad breath that won’t go away
  • Red or swollen gums
  • Tender or bleeding gums
  • Painful chewing
  • Loose teeth
  • Sensitive teeth
  • Receding gums or longer appearing teeth

But there is good news! Periodontal Disease can be prevented and treated.  I know you have been told all through your life that good oral hygiene is important for healthy teeth and gums.  It is true!  Regular brushing and flossing can mitigate your chances of gum disease.  That however is only the first step.  Regular dental check-ups and dental cleanings are important for maintaining a healthy smile.

 

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Even Seniors Get Cavities

Even Seniors Get CavitiesEven Seniors Get Cavities

As we entered the new millennium, it was discovered that seniors were getting more dental cavities than children. Today, children and seniors are still the two highest at-risk groups for tooth decay. Aging puts us at greater risk for dental problems. The wearing away of tooth enamel, receding gums and loss of jawbone are signs that our mouths are aging along with our bodies.
Fortunately, there are now dental technologies and treatments to keep our smiles intact longer. That’s great news for seniors. The bad news is anyone with natural teeth can get dental cavities. And the longer we have our teeth, the more we expose them to the elements that can cause tooth decay.
Unfortunately, geriatric teeth are less able to handle the normal wear and tear of those in younger generations. There are several reasons why seniors may be prone to more dental cavities:
·        Difficulty brushing & flossing
·        Not enough fluoride
·        Gum disease
·        Dry mouth
·        Poor diet
There are several ways seniors can stay cavity-free. A diet low in sugar and high in calcium promotes tooth health. Fluoride toothpastes, mouth rinses or tablets can help. Drinking water, sucking on sugar-free candy or chewing sugarless gum promotes saliva production and reduces dry mouth.
For seniors with mobility or dexterity problems, wrap tape or an elastic bandage around the toothbrush. If a wider grip is needed, try taping a tennis ball, sponge or rubber bicycle grip to the handle. An electric toothbrush may also be helpful for those who cannot maneuver a manual toothbrush easily. And daily flossing should not be forgotten, either — floss holders and waxed floss may make it easier for seniors to continue their oral hygiene routine.
Because of the special dental needs of seniors, regular dental visits are still essential. We use this time to check for the dental problems that affect older patients, including cavities, gum disease, root decay and oral cancer.

Are your Gums Receding or Extra Sensitive?

gum grafting

Gum Grafts: Stick It to Receding Gums

Take a look at your gums. Do they look like they’re receding or do they feel extra sensitive lately? If yes, it’s time to come in for a visit. Receding gums are a sign of two things: gum disease or overly aggressive brushing. Left untreated, gum disease can lead to tooth loss and even heart disease. For early stages of gum disease, we can use a non-surgical scaling and root planing (SRP) treatment to get your gums healthy again. Excessive gum recession, however, sometimes requires a surgical treatment called a gum graft.
Once your gums start to recede, brushing with a lighter hand will only be effective if there is still adequate gum tissue left to act as a barrier from disease and bone loss. But if your gums have receded to the extent that your tooth roots are exposed, you may need a gum graft. Exposed tooth roots can cause varying degrees of tooth sensitivity or make your teeth appear longer than normal. But more importantly, exposed tooth roots can leave your teeth vulnerable to bacteria and periodontal disease.
Gum grafts may also be used to correct a high frenum attachment. The frenum is the muscle between the upper or lower front teeth; if it pulls on the gum margin, recession could result. Orthodontic therapies can also stretch the gum line and cause the gums to recede. In all cases, gum grafts are an excellent way to protect the underlying bone and prevent the gums from receding further.

Regular Checkups Can Save you Thousands!

regular checkups can save you money
Regular Checkups Can Save You Thousands
If you have dental problems like tooth decay, gum disease or even oral cancer, regular dental visits give your dentist a chance to catch it early on. That’s key. Because the earlier your dentist diagnoses a problem the easier it is to treat. For example, if you have gum disease and let it go unchecked (and untreated) for too long, you may need extensive — and expensive — gum disease treatment.
Regular dental checkups allow you and your dentist to stay ahead of problems, which can translate into thousands saved.
A professional dental cleaning is also a must because it’s the only way to effectively remove tartar (hardened plaque). Even if you brush and floss regularly, that’s not enough. Besides looking unsightly (tartar is a “stain magnet” and often has a brown or yellowish tint), tartar also contains cavity-causing bacteria. Preventing the need for a mouthful of fillings every year easily adds up to thousands saved in the long run.
Perhaps one of the most important reasons to invest in regular dental exams and cleanings is that it has a positive impact on your overall health. Recent studies have shown that there’s a link between periodontal disease and heart disease; when the former is present, the latter is twice as likely.
According to the American Academy of Periodontology, gum disease can have a domino effect on your health. The bacteria caused by periodontal disease can enter your bloodstream and attach to your heart’s blood vessels, causing dangerous blood clots. Another scenario is that the plaque buildup caused by periodontal disease can cause the heart’s blood vessels to swell.
In this way, regular checkups and cleanings are not only money-saving but life-saving. And that’s priceless.

Obesity and Tooth Decay Go Hand-in-Hand?

obesity and tooth decay

Obesity is truly becoming a plague affecting the entire planet.  It is a condition caused when the body collects too much body fat.  This condition causes a person to be unhealthy which in turn can cause various diseases as well as premature death.  The truth of the matter is obesity is preventable.  One out of every 3 people in the United States is affected with this horrible affliction and the problem continues to grow.

What causes obesity?

  • Eating more food than your body can use
  • Drinking too much alcohol
  • Not getting enough exercise
  • Biology

So how does that affect your teeth?

Eating foods with lots of calories tend to have lots of sugar. The combination of bacteria and food causes tooth decay.   The more times you eat, the more bacteria is present in your mouth feeding on your teeth.   As the bacteria feed on the sugars in the food you eat, they make acids. The acids attack the teeth for 20 minutes or more after eating. Over a period of time, these acids destroy tooth enamel, resulting in tooth decay.

Researchers from the University of Washington School of Dentistry suggest there may be a connection between a high glycemic diet and dental disease.  In other words, the high amounts of sugar found in processed foods, refined flour, rice and other products produce the bacteria that turns to acid and attack your teeth after eating.  These sugars turn into plaque on your teeth and when not removed contribute to tooth decay, gingivitis, gum disease and periodontitis. 

How do you Prevent this from Happening?

The answer is simple really.  Regular check-ups to the dentist and a healthy balanced diet enriched with water fresh fruits, vegetables, healthy proteins and whole grains.

 

Address:
8430 Univ. Exec. Park Drive Suite 610
Charlotte, NC 28262
Telephone:

704-510-1150

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704-510-1220

 

 

 

 

Myths About Gum Disease

Myths About Gum Disease

Gum disease is an infection of the tissues that surround and support your teeth. It is a major cause of tooth loss in adults. Because gum disease is usually painless, you may not know you have it.

gum-disease

MYTH #1: Gum disease is not that common.

On the contrary, gum disease is extremely common, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which notes nearly half of adults over age 30 suffer from some form of gum disease. Gum disease, an infection of the tissues that surround and support your teeth, is caused by plaque, the sticky film of bacteria that is constantly forming on our teeth. Plaque that is not removed with thorough daily brushing and cleaning between teeth can eventually harden into calculus or tartar.

MYTH #2: I don’t have any cavities so I can’t have gum disease.

Being cavity-free doesn’t ensure you are in the clear where gum disease is concerned. That’s because gum disease is painless and many people have no idea they have it. Gums that bleed easily or are red, swollen or tender is a sign of gingivitis, the earliest stage of gum disease and the only stage that is reversible. When caught early gingivitis can usually be eliminated by a professional cleaning at the dental office, followed by daily brushing and flossing.

MYTH #3: Having gum disease means I’m going to lose my teeth, right?

Not so! You don’t have to lose any of your teeth to gum disease if you practice good oral hygiene. That means brushing your teeth twice a day, cleaning between your teeth daily, eating a healthy diet, and scheduling regular dental visits. Even if you are diagnosed with gum disease, your dentist can design a treatment plan to help you keep it under control.

MYTH #4: Bleeding gums during pregnancy is normal.

While it’s true that some women develop a condition known as “pregnancy gingivitis,” it’s not true that everyone experiences this. You can help prevent this condition by taking extra care during your brushing and flossing routine. Your dentist may recommend more frequent cleanings to prevent this.

MYTH #5: Everyone has bad breath sometimes. It doesn’t mean they have gum disease.

Persistent bad breath or a bad taste in your mouth can be an indicator of gum disease and other oral diseases so it is important that you uncover what’s causing the problem. If constantly have bad breath, make an appointment to see your dentist. Regular checkups allow your dentist to detect any problems as your bad breath may be the sign of a medical disorder. If your dentist determines that your mouth is healthy, you may be referred to your primary care physician.

MYTH #6: I have diabetes. Does that mean I will get gum disease?

Diabetes is a chronic disease which affects your body’s ability to process sugar. The resulting high blood sugar can cause problems with your eyes, nerves, kidneys, heart and other parts of your body. Diabetes can also lower your resistance to infection and can slow the healing process. If you have diabetes, you are at greater risk of developing some oral health problems, including gum disease, so it’s important that you are extra diligent with your oral health. Always brush your teeth twice a day for two minutes with fluoride toothpaste, floss daily, and see your dentist regularly.

For more info visit http://www.mouthhealthy.org

For any oral health concerns Contact Glasscock Dental

8430 Univ. Exec. Park Drive Suite 610 Charlotte, NC 28262

Do You Have Chronic Bad Breath?

Persistent bad breath or a bad taste in your mouth may be warning signs of gum (periodontal) disease. Gum disease is caused by the buildup of plaque on teeth. The bacteria cause toxins to form in the mouth, which irritate the gums. If gum disease continues untreated, it can damage the gums and jawbone.

bad-breath

Other dental causes of bad breath include poorly fitting dental appliances, yeast infections of the mouth, and dental cavities.

The medical condition dry mouth (also called xerostomia) can also cause bad breath. Saliva is necessary to moisten and cleanse the mouth by neutralizing acids produced by plaque and washing away dead cells that accumulate on the tongue, gums, and cheeks. If not removed, these cells decompose and can cause bad breath. Dry mouth may be caused by the side effects of various medications, salivary gland problems, or continuous breathing through the mouth.

Many other diseases and illnesses may cause bad breath. Here are some to be aware of: respiratory tract infections such as pneumonia or bronchitis, chronic sinus infections, postnasal drip, diabetes, chronic acid reflux, and liver or kidney problems.

Contact Glasscock Dental with any of your oral health concerns.

8430 Univ. Exec. Park Drive Suite 610 Charlotte, NC 28262