Tag Archives: tooth decay

Avoiding the Baby Bottle Blues

avoiding the baby bottle bluesAvoiding the Baby Bottle Blues

When it comes to thumb sucking, babies are naturals — maybe because they practice even before they are born. Children begin sucking on their thumb while in the womb to develop the skills necessary for breastfeeding. Not surprisingly swapping a thumb for a pacifier or baby bottle is an easy transition for many kids.
In a child’s first few years, pacifier use generally doesn’t cause problems. But constant, long-term pacifier use, especially once permanent teeth come in, can lead to dental complications. Constant sucking can cause top front teeth to slant out, and bottom front teeth to tilt in. It also can lead to jaw misalignment (such as an overbite) and a narrowing of the roof of the mouth.
It is generally advised that children stop or drastically reduce their pacifier use around age 3. If a child is dependent on the pacifier to be calmed and soothed, try giving it to him or her only when absolutely necessary and using positive reinforcement to wean them off the habit.
Many children also use a baby bottle longer than necessary. Apart from the risks associated with the sucking motion, bottles also carry a heavy risk of promoting tooth decay if they contain anything other than water.
Frequently sucking or sipping on milk or juice from a bottle over an extended period of time will increase your child’s risk of tooth decay. When sugars and carbohydrates come in consistent contact with teeth they create an environment for decay-causing bacteria to thrive. Tooth decay can lead to painful infection and in extreme cases children may need to have a tooth extraction or dental treatment to extensively repair damaged teeth.
Long-term use of pacifiers and bottles can lead to speech and dental problems as your child gets older. Since children develop at different ages, it is a good idea to speak with your dentist and pediatrician to make sure that your infant or toddler’s early oral habits don’t cause problems.
Advertisements

Obesity and Tooth Decay Go Hand-in-Hand?

obesity and tooth decay

Obesity is truly becoming a plague affecting the entire planet.  It is a condition caused when the body collects too much body fat.  This condition causes a person to be unhealthy which in turn can cause various diseases as well as premature death.  The truth of the matter is obesity is preventable.  One out of every 3 people in the United States is affected with this horrible affliction and the problem continues to grow.

What causes obesity?

  • Eating more food than your body can use
  • Drinking too much alcohol
  • Not getting enough exercise
  • Biology

So how does that affect your teeth?

Eating foods with lots of calories tend to have lots of sugar. The combination of bacteria and food causes tooth decay.   The more times you eat, the more bacteria is present in your mouth feeding on your teeth.   As the bacteria feed on the sugars in the food you eat, they make acids. The acids attack the teeth for 20 minutes or more after eating. Over a period of time, these acids destroy tooth enamel, resulting in tooth decay.

Researchers from the University of Washington School of Dentistry suggest there may be a connection between a high glycemic diet and dental disease.  In other words, the high amounts of sugar found in processed foods, refined flour, rice and other products produce the bacteria that turns to acid and attack your teeth after eating.  These sugars turn into plaque on your teeth and when not removed contribute to tooth decay, gingivitis, gum disease and periodontitis. 

How do you Prevent this from Happening?

The answer is simple really.  Regular check-ups to the dentist and a healthy balanced diet enriched with water fresh fruits, vegetables, healthy proteins and whole grains.

 

Address:
8430 Univ. Exec. Park Drive Suite 610
Charlotte, NC 28262
Telephone:

704-510-1150

Fax:

704-510-1220

 

 

 

 

Crystal Meth can Destroy your Teeth in a Year

Methamphetamine- Dr. Glasscock

 

Methamphetamine is a  synthetic drug with more rapid and lasting effects than amphetamine. It is used illegally as a stimulant and as a prescription drug to treat narcolepsy and maintain blood pressure.

The use and production of methamphetamine is becoming a huge problem in the U.S. This drug is illegal and highly addictive.  Common names for the drug are ice, meth, speed, crank, quartz, crystal and poor man’s cocaine. Using methamphetamine can cause major health issues as well as serious problems to your mouth and teeth.

The “high” from meth last for about 12 hours.  During that time, your body’s salivary glands diminish causing a dry- mouth feeling.  This state is commonly referred to as “meth mouth”.  Without the aided production from your salivary glands, the acids on your teeth will destroy the tooth enamel which in turn leads to tooth decay.  It is also reported by users, while using meth, it is common to consume high calorie carbonated drinks and foods and tooth grinding and clenching occurs.  This in turn compounds the problems.

A meth user will see serious affects related to their teeth in a short period of time. The ADA stated users can go from having a sparkling smile to one of decay and tooth loss in about a year. 

So what can your dentist do?  Without the user discontinuing the use of the drug, the damage will continue to diminish a person’s teeth.  The damage can not be addressed until that first step is taken. You need the production of your salivary glands to stop the damage and while using, that would be impossible.

Address:
8430 Univ. Exec. Park Drive Suite 610
Charlotte, NC 28262
Telephone:

704-510-1150

Fax:

704-510-1220

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Methamphetamine

Layaway at the Dentist?

layaway at the dentist

Why going to the dentist is important

With the advancement of modern medicine, it has been proven that your dental health affects your physical health.  With that being said, a regular visit to your dentist is needed to ensure you remain in the best physical health.

Dental Care- The neglected part of health care.

People tend to neglect their dental needs.  Many people believe that their dental health is optional but in truth it is not.  Tooth decay is the single most common and preventable disease afflicting most Americans. Having a tooth ache or cavity is as common as the common cold.  Left untreated, your dental problems will become more extensive as well as more expensive to correct.

Age Group Average Number of Decayed Missing or Filled Teeth Per Person Percent of Decayed Missing or Filled Teeth Per 100 teeth est Percent of Age Group Affected by Tooth Decay
2-5 1.01 5.05% 27.90%
6-11 0.42 1.75% 49%
12’15 1.75 6.25% 49.60%
16’19 3.25 11.60% 67.90%
20-39 7.07 25.25% 86.70%
40-59 12.85 45.89% 95.10%
60+ 17.46 62.36% 93.10%

What is Dental Layaway?

Just like healthcare, dental care can be intrusively expensive for families.   The office of David M. Glasscock DDS Family and Cosmetic Dentistry has a solution!  We provide pre-payment options or Dental Layaway. We can set up an account for you to use when ever needed.  Almost like a prepaid credit card.  Regardless if you add $20 per month or $10 per week, dental layaway is the solution to the unexpected dental expenses that seem to pop up now and then.  For more information call the office of David M. Glasscock . Ph#  704-510-1150

Should Elementary Schools Provide Preventative Dentistry Services?

As California educators struggle to boost student achievement across economic lines, teeth are holding them back.

Hundreds of thousands of low-income children suffering from dental disease, some with teeth rotted to the gum line, are presenting California school districts with a widespread public health problem.

Increasingly, dental health advocates are looking to schools to help solve the crisis. Several school districts, including Oakland Unified, are running innovative programs to provide dental care at no cost to students. Third-party insurers are billed whenever possible, but insurance is not a prerequisite for treatment.

school children at dentist

Meanwhile, a full-service dental clinic opened last year at Peres Elementary School in Richmond’s Iron Triangle neighborhood. The clinic offers everything from applying resin sealant to kids’ teeth — a vital preventive measure to stave off cavities and decay — to fillings and extractions. The West Contra Costa school district hopes to expand the model to other schools.

Dental disease is at “epidemic” levels among California children, according to the U.S. Surgeon General, and low-income children are disproportionately affected. They are 12 times more likely to miss school because of dental problems than children from higher-income families, according to a 2008 report by the Healthy States Initiative, a coalition sponsored by the Council of State Governments to study state health problems.

What’s more, students suffering from toothache tend to have lower grade-point averages than students with healthy teeth.

“The issue is huge,” said Gordon Jackson, director of the state Department of Education’s Coordinated Student Support and Adult Education Division, which oversees health, counseling and other support programs provided at schools. “Tooth decay remains one of the most chronic diseases for children and adolescents. As we’re having the conversation about California’s future and student academic achievement, we have to have a conversation about oral health as well.”

Inside the sleek new student health center at James Madison Middle School in Oakland, dental hygienist Linda G. Cannon has beamed her headlamp into the mouths of hundreds of students from the middle school and nearby Sobrante Park Elementary School.

Two days a week, during the physical education class period or the “sixth period” extra time, students spend about 50 minutes each in the baby-blue dental chair. With the whoosh of the suction tool as a soundtrack, Cannon screens for tooth decay, cleans teeth, applies fluoride varnish, which can help prevent tooth decay, and applies tooth sealant, an effective barrier to cavities, particularly on molars. The clinic doesn’t provide fillings or restorative dentistry to fix severe problems.

The Alameda County Public Health Department and The Atlantic Philanthropies, a New York-based private foundation, fund the dental services.

While Cannon said she’s starting to see signs of improvement in student dental health since the clinic opened in February 2011, the problem persists. “It sometimes looks like they’ve never been to the dentist,” she said.

Of the more than 400 students screened at James Madison in the past two years, nearly three quarters of elementary school students and just over half of middle school students showed signs of tooth decay, Cannon said.

While similar dental care programs operate in other districts, they are still a rarity in the state. Many other districts lack the resources to offer dental care, and still others balk at being asked to provide dental care on top of a rigorous curriculum.

Still, schools have a vested interest in addressing the issue.

Dental problems keep California students out of class an estimated 874,000 days a year, costing schools nearly $30 million in lost attendance based-funding, according to the 2007 California Health Interview Survey, an ongoing statewide survey by the Center for Health Policy Research at UC Los Angeles. The study is still considered the benchmark for children’s oral health.

Would you like to see this in your local Elementary Schools?

For any oral health concerns Contact Glasscock Dental

8430 Univ. Exec. Park Drive Suite 610 Charlotte, NC 28262

2 Min 2X a Day Campaign for Children’s Oral Health

Coalition of More Than 35 Leading Dental Organizations Joins Ad Council to Launch First Campaign on Children’s Oral Health

Campaign partners include Sesame Street, DreamWorks Animation, Cartoon Network, MyKazoo!, Grey Group and Wing

http://www.ada.org/7284.aspx

NEW YORK, NY, August 14, 2012 /PRNewswire/ — According to a survey released by the Ad Council today less than half (44%) of parents in the U.S. report that their child brushes their teeth twice a day or more. In time for back-to-school season, the Ad Council is joining The Partnership for Healthy Mouths, Healthy Lives, a coalition of more than 35 leading dental health organizations, to debut Kids’ Healthy Mouths, their first joint national multimedia public service campaign designed to teach parents and caregivers, as well as children, about the importance of oral health and the simple ways in which they can help prevent oral disease. The English and Spanish-language public service ads are being distributed to media outlets nationwide today.

Dental decay is the most common chronic childhood disease with more than 16 million kids suffering from untreated tooth decay in the U.S. The mouth is the gateway to a person’s overall health, and an unhealthy mouth can be associated with obesity, diabetes and even heart disease. In the U.S., oral disease causes kids to miss 51 million school hours and their parents to lose 25 million work hours annually. Additionally, oral disease disproportionately affects children from low-income families and these children have almost twice the number of decayed teeth that have not been treated by a dentist as compared to others in the general population.

Created pro bono by ad agencies Grey Group and Wing in New York, the new Kids’ Healthy Mouths public service campaign is aimed at parents and caregivers throughout the U.S., particularly low-income families, and stresses the importance of brushing for 2 minutes twice a day.

According to the Ad Council survey released today, 60% of parents with children ages 12 or younger report that they do not regularly help their child brush their teeth or check to make sure they’ve done a good job. Additionally, close to one-third (31%) report arguing with their kids at least once a week about brushing their teeth. Parents also report that, on average, their child wastes over two hours each day on things that are silly or unnecessary, such as playing video games, texting, or watching an online video. The new campaign notes that some of this time could instead be focused on improving their oral health.

“The messages in this campaign may seem simple, but their impact will be felt for years to come,” said Gary Price, Secretary and CEO of the Dental Trade Alliance Foundation. “Most mouth disease is preventable using steps that can easily become a part of every child’s life routine. We are proud to be a part of such a broad partnership to help parents and caregivers learn how easy it is to protect their children, give them healthy mouths and help them lead healthy lives.”

The English and Spanish-language TV, radio, print, outdoor and digital PSAs poke fun at the myriad of inane things children spend their time doing and highlight that it only takes 2 minutes, twice a day to help maintain a healthy mouth and prevent future oral pain. An additional English and Spanish-language PSA features Elmo from Sesame Street singing to kids, reminding them to “Brushy Brush” their teeth every day as part of Sesame Street’s Healthy Teeth, Healthy Me campaign. The new campaign also includes a PSA featuring “Tooth” – the Tooth Fairy from Rise of the Guardians, the upcoming film from DreamWorks Animation SKG Inc..

“This is a great opportunity for Sesame Street to continue to use its influence to help families and their children make healthy decisions about oral health,” said Dr. Jeanette Betancourt, Senior Vice President for Outreach and Educational Practices, Sesame Workshop. “We are excited to partner with the Ad Council when nurturing children’s overall development is so critical and the subsequent positive effects can last a lifetime.”

“We are thrilled to work with the Ad Council and support this campaign by helping to convey the importance of oral health,” said Susan Spencer, DreamWorks Animation’s Head of National Promotions and Marketing Services.

All of the PSAs direct parents and caregivers to a new website, 2min2x.org (which is available in English and Spanish, and includes a mobile version), where parents and children can watch entertaining videos and listen to music—all 2 minutes in length—while children are brushing their teeth. Campaign media partners, including Cartoon Network and My Kazoo!, donated snippets of videos and songs for the site. A series of social media strategies will also be implemented to engage parents and children, including messaging on Facebook and Twitter and a dedicated YouTube channel, www.youtube.com/2min2x, where the 2-minute content will be featured.

This campaign is the first in the Ad Council’s 70 year history to address oral health. The Ad Council is distributing the new PSAs to more than 33,000 media outlets nationwide and the ads will air and run in advertising time and space entirely donated by the media. Several media companies have committed to supporting the PSAs prior to their launch.

Bring your children in for a cleaning.  Contact Glasscock Dental for more information.

8430 Univ. Exec. Park Drive Suite 610 Charlotte, NC 28262

Dental Sealants Safe For Children?

Sealants are a great way to help prevent against tooth decay and cavities on your back teeth (molars), especially for Children.   These are the teeth that are most vulnerable to cavities and decay because they are used in the chewing process, and are the most difficult to reach and clean.

Molars first come in at around 5-7 years of age, with a second set coming in between the ages of 11-14. It is best to have a sealant placed when the molars first come in to ensure they are protected early.

To place a sealant, an adhesive is first applied to the teeth. The sealant is then placed over the adhesive as a liquid, as if it is painted right onto the tooth. The liquid then hardens and creates a barrier between your tooth and any plaque, food particles, and bacteria.

In dental circles, the question of sealants has been hotly debated for nearly 50 years, and at least since the ADA awarded the product its seal of approval in 1976. While there have been concerns that the sealants may expose children to the controversial estrogen-like chemical bisphenol A, or BPA, the benefits in preventing kids’ cavities outweigh the risks, the American Dental Association states.

Interested in Sealants? Contact Glasscock Dental for more information.

8430 Univ. Exec. Park Drive Suite 610
Charlotte, NC 28262