Tag Archives: plaque

Dental Issues Women can Experience as they Age

 

anne_hathaway

Oral health goes way beyond having amazing white teeth and no cavities. Daily brushing and flossing although very important are not the only determination as to how well your teeth maintain over time. Sometimes, during various cycles in your life, especially for women, a little more work in needed.  Regular dental appointments play an important part in keeping your teeth and gums in good repair.  Your dentist can identify issues going on with your teeth or gums that may go unnoticed by you without their help.

For women specifically, oral health care needs to change at specific time during her lifespan. This is because, pregnancy, oral contraceptives, menopause, menstruation as well as other factors contribute to the change in hormones in a women’s body.  The female sex hormones at various states in a women’s life effects how her mouth responds to plaque. Without extra attention to brushing, flossing and dental cleanings during these fluctuations, plaque will build causing cavities and gum disease.

Did you know 1 out of every 4 women between the ages of 30-54 have been reported with periodontitis?  In addition, 1 out of every 2 women between the ages 55-90 are reported with periodontitis.  This number can dramatically decrease with help from your dentist.  Your dentist is aware of these fluctuations in your body chemistry and can advise you the best ways to compensate when your oral health is negatively responding to your body’s chemistry.

Why see your dentist during hormonal changes?

  • Menstruation– some women find their gums swell and bleed
  • Pregnancy– makes your mouth more susceptible to gingivitis
  • Using Oral Contraceptive– possible hormonal gingivitis
  • Menopause– hormonal changes can lead to periodontitis
  • Osteoporosis– Can lead to tooth loss

 

Glasscock Dental
430 Univ. Exec. Park Drive Suite 610
Charlotte, NC 28262
Telephone:

704-510-1150

 Email:smile@glasscockdental.com
Business Hours
Monday: 8 a.m.- 5 p.m.
Tuesday: 8 a.m.- 5 p.m.
Wednesday: 8 a.m.- 5 p.m.
Thursday: 7:30 a.m.- 2 p.m.
Friday: 8 a.m.- 2 p.m. – Every Other Week
Saturday: Closed
Sunday: Closed

Red Wine is Good!

red wine and your teeth

 

Now really… Who doesn’t love that glass of wine with dinner?  I know. Your thinking its not the best choice. A refreshing glass of water with dinner would be the best choice for my teeth. (sad face)

Today, the tides have turned!  Let me give you a good reason to have that glass of wine and indulge in all its red grapey goodness.  A study published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry has shown that the  compounds in red wine can prevent cavities and plaque build-up.  Red wine and grape seed extract contain antimicrobial elements that were found to help kill bacteria in simulated lab tests.

To test their theory, a  study, lead by an authority of wine chemistry from Spain, tested multiple apparatuses with bacteria associated with dental plaque.  The findings concluded that, “Red wine with or without alcohol and wine with grape seed extract were the most effective at getting rid of the bacteria that develops cavities and subsequent tooth loss that affects an estimated 60 to 90 percent of the global population.”

Many different studies are finding that there are many health benefits associated with drinking a glass of red wine.  Ah, but with anything good there is always the bad side.  Red Wine does in fact stain your teeth and consuming large amounts of alcohol has serious adverse effects on your overall health.  As with anything, moderation is the key.

Address:
8430 Univ. Exec. Park Drive Suite 610
Charlotte, NC 28262
Telephone:

704-510-1150

 Email:smile@glasscockdental.com
Business Hours
Monday: 8 a.m.- 5 p.m.
Tuesday: 8 a.m.- 5 p.m.
Wednesday: 8 a.m.- 5 p.m.
Thursday: 7:30 a.m.- 2 p.m.
Friday: 8 a.m.- 2 p.m. – Every Other Week
Saturday: Closed
Sunday: Closed

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/277305.php

http://www.indianwineacademy.com/item_2_604.aspx

http://www.nydailynews.com/life-style/health/red-wine-fight-cavities-article-1.1802473

 

Obesity and Tooth Decay Go Hand-in-Hand?

obesity and tooth decay

Obesity is truly becoming a plague affecting the entire planet.  It is a condition caused when the body collects too much body fat.  This condition causes a person to be unhealthy which in turn can cause various diseases as well as premature death.  The truth of the matter is obesity is preventable.  One out of every 3 people in the United States is affected with this horrible affliction and the problem continues to grow.

What causes obesity?

  • Eating more food than your body can use
  • Drinking too much alcohol
  • Not getting enough exercise
  • Biology

So how does that affect your teeth?

Eating foods with lots of calories tend to have lots of sugar. The combination of bacteria and food causes tooth decay.   The more times you eat, the more bacteria is present in your mouth feeding on your teeth.   As the bacteria feed on the sugars in the food you eat, they make acids. The acids attack the teeth for 20 minutes or more after eating. Over a period of time, these acids destroy tooth enamel, resulting in tooth decay.

Researchers from the University of Washington School of Dentistry suggest there may be a connection between a high glycemic diet and dental disease.  In other words, the high amounts of sugar found in processed foods, refined flour, rice and other products produce the bacteria that turns to acid and attack your teeth after eating.  These sugars turn into plaque on your teeth and when not removed contribute to tooth decay, gingivitis, gum disease and periodontitis. 

How do you Prevent this from Happening?

The answer is simple really.  Regular check-ups to the dentist and a healthy balanced diet enriched with water fresh fruits, vegetables, healthy proteins and whole grains.

 

Address:
8430 Univ. Exec. Park Drive Suite 610
Charlotte, NC 28262
Telephone:

704-510-1150

Fax:

704-510-1220

 

 

 

 

Reverse The Signs of Gingivitis

Gingivitis is an oral health condition most often associated with poor oral hygiene. However, gingivitis as a condition can be reversed when it is in its incipient phase.

If you do not pay special attention to your dental care routine, and you allow gingivitis to turn into something more complex such as gum disease, the treatment is much more complex and painful, and you might be exposed to the risk of losing teeth permanently.

gingivitis

Take note of the following tips which will help you prevent and cure gingivitis related problems:

Preventing Gingivitis: Brush your teeth for longer than regular The American Dental Association says that people in general spend even less than 1 minute to brush their teeth, which is not good. People should remember the rule of 3- that is, brushing the teeth for three times per day,for approximately 3 minutes each time. This is a rule especially important for patients with gingivitis. This way, you will spend 9 minutes in total per day on your oral health routine, but this is going to bring you huge benefits.

Preventing Gingivitis: Massage your gums and teeth during the day Dental specialists say that brushing your teeth “dry” or without using any toothpaste is extremely beneficial for gum health. While you read your newspaper or watch your favorite TV show, you should make a habit of massaging your gums with your toothbrush. This will help increasing the blood flow to your gums and make them healthier and stronger.

Preventing Gingivitis: Always use a toothbrush with soft bristles Using a toothbrush with very stiff bristles can easily damage the soft tissue within your mouth, and instead of healing you will make your gums bleed even more. Also you should not forget to brush/scrape your tongue to get rid of the harmful deposits and bacteria from your mouth, and also brush your palate with the soft bristles.

Preventing Gingivitis: Cleanse the pockets in your gums with an irrigator Waterpik for instance can help you irrigate thoroughly the pockets within your gums, and this way you will get rid of all the harmful food particles, bacteria and debris that might reside there. The irrigator will cleanse properly your gums, the space in between your teeth, plus it also performs a gentle massage process to your gums to increase blood flow.

Preventing Gingivitis: Controlling plaque is important Your mouth really needs to be tartar and plaque free if you want to maintain good oral health. For this, you should use a toothpaste for tartar control, which will not allow these harmful deposits to form.

Preventing Gingivitis: Baking soda + water Mix baking soda and a few drops of water until you get a paste that you will use to brush your teeth twice a week. Baking soda helps scrubbing away all the debris from the gum line and from in between your teeth, and it also helps polishing and deodorizing your mouth. Plaque deposits are also successfully scrubbed away with the help of baking soda.

Preventing Gingivitis: Rinse your mouth as often as possible You probably can’t brush your teeth each time you consume a meal.However, you should rinse your mouth with clear water every time after eating. This will help clearing your mouth of all accumulated debris and food particles, so you can have a clean mouth all day long. Don’t give bacteria a chance to develop- swish around with clean water often throughout the day

If you are interested in more information about Gingivitis, Contact Glasscock Dental with any of your oral health concerns.

8430 Univ. Exec. Park Drive Suite 610 Charlotte, NC 28262

Read more at http://worldental.org

New Year and New Dental Tips for 2013

What’s your New Year’s resolution for 2013? You may be considering resolving to save money, get a better job or lose weight. Many people set new goals about having a healthier lifestyle in the new year. Why not make one of your New Year’s resolutions improving your dental health?january

Healthy resolutions can keep your teeth healthy, and any of the following changes will go a long way toward giving you a healthier smile for 2013:

Eat Plenty of Fruits and Vegetables

Eating well is important for your dental health. Poor nutrition can affect the entire immune system, increasing susceptibility to many common oral disorders, including gum (periodontal) disease. Antioxidants and other nutrients found in fruits, vegetables, legumes and nuts improve your body’s ability to fight bacteria and inflammation, helping to protect your teeth and gums. In addition, crisp fruits and raw vegetables like apples, carrots and celery help clean plaque from teeth and freshen breath.

Quit Smoking or Using Other Tobacco Products

Using tobacco can harm your mouth in a number of ways, increasing your risk for tooth discoloration, cavities, gum recession, gum disease and throat, lung and oral cancer. Smokers are about twice as likely to lose their teeth as non-smokers. It’s not just smoking tobacco that has negative effects on your oral health: use of smokeless tobacco can be just as harmful to your oral health. The good news is that the risk of tooth loss decreases after you quit smoking or using smokeless tobacco.

Limit Your Alcohol Intake

You may already know that excessive alcohol intake can have an effect on your overall health, but did you know that it may also affect your oral health? According to the Academy of General Dentistry, those who smoke, eat poorly and consume excessive alcohol also have increased gum recession (periodontal pocketing). Their studies show that smokers who regularly consume alcohol are less likely to brush their teeth on a regular basis and are less concerned about their basic health than nonsmokers.

Brush at Least Twice a Day and Floss at Least Once a Day

Brushing and flossing protect your teeth from decay and gum disease, which is caused by your teeth’s most persistent enemy, plaque – a sticky, colorless, invisible film of harmful bacteria that builds up on your teeth every day. Both brushing and flossing are equally important for good oral health: according to the Academy of General Dentistry, only flossing can remove plaque from between teeth and below the gumline, where decay and gum disease often begins.

Without proper brushing and flossing, you may develop bleeding gums, which may worsen to severely swollen, red, bleeding gums (gingivitis) and, eventually, gum disease. Because diseases of the mouth can affect the rest of your body, it is especially important to maintain good oral health.

See Your Dentist for Regular Checkups

By seeing your dentist at least twice a year, you can help prevent any dental health problems before they cause discomfort or require more comprehensive or expensive treatment. Regular visits allow your dentist to monitor your oral health and recommend a dental health regimen to address areas of concern.

In 2013, resolve to treat your mouth right: improve your diet, quit smoking and improve your oral hygiene habits – your teeth and your body will thank you for it!