Tag Archives: periodontal disease

What’s Up With Morning Breath?

whats-up-with-morning-breathHave you ever woken up in the morning snuggling with your significant other?  Waking up happy, relaxed and comfortable as reality begins to roll back in ?   As you’re thinking, “How could life be any better?”, when a devastating new thought pops in your head.  The reality of your offensive morning breath rushes to the front of your thoughts.  Now that could be an ugly end to a perfect moment.  Being careful to keep your mouth shut, you hurry to the bathroom to begin your morning ritual. Sound familiar?

Why Do We Have Morning Breath?

The big question is why do we have morning breath?   The main reason for morning breath is from a lack of saliva. When we sleep, saliva production slows down.  Saliva is what is needed to wash away bacteria, food particles and acids from your mouth and teeth.  As your mouth begins getting dryer, bacteria flourish, causing bad breath to increase.

What Makes Morning Breath Worse?

Everyone has a degree of bad breath when they wake.  The degree of your morning breath can be affected by many things.

Mouth Breathers are susceptible to bad breath.  When your mouth is open, it becomes very dry causing the bacteria in the mouth to flourish.  This happening over an 8 hour period can make for a foul smell come morning.

Many medications cause dry mouth. Medications such as Aleve or Advil Cold and Sinus, Benadryl, Lipitor Tabs or Omeprazole can cause your mouth to become more dry. If you are a person using one of these medications, you might be affected by dry mouth which will in turn increase morning breath.

Another indicator of excessive morning breath is a person with gingivitis or periodontal disease.  These conditions indicate that food, plaque and bacteria has entered underneath the gums.  As saliva production reduces, this condition will intensify a persons morning breath.

How Do You Reduce Morning Breath?

There is not much that can be done to eliminate bad breath in the morning but it can be made better.  Brushing and flossing your teeth before bed is important for removing excess bacteria from your teeth. As we mentioned, bacteria flourishes in a dry environment.  Removing as much food particles and bacteria from your mouth before bed will help the problem.   The use of a tongue scraper at bedtime is also helpful as it too will eliminate bacteria from your tongue.  Drinking a glass of water at bedtime is also helpful.  Keeping your body hydrated is good for your health and well as your teeth.

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What is Arestin?

arestin

If you need to go for a deep cleaning then chances are you have periodontal disease that needs to be treated.  A deep cleaning is usually the first stage to begin the process of removing the bacteria and particles from underneath your gums.  The bacteria and particles break down your gums by detaching them from your teeth.  You can take that one step further by adding Arestin to your deep cleaning process.  The Arestin will be applied to the infected areas after your treatment.  The Arestin will dissolve so no removal is required.

What is Arestin?

Arestin is an antibiotic that helps kill the bacteria under your gums.  It is tiny particles that are smaller than a grain of sand.  The microspheres are filled with the antibiotic minocycline hydrochloride.  These microspheres release the antibiotic over a 90 day period.  This is turn kills the bacteria under your gums so your gums can heal better than without it.

After Arestin Treatment

After treatment, avoid chewing hard, crunchy or sticky foods for 7 days.  You should also not floss or use a dental pick in the treated areas for 10 days,  Drink plenty of water.

After the days have passed, it is important to maintain a good oral health routine.  This should include brushing twice a day as well as flossing.  If you have any questions, feel free to give the office of Glasscock Dental a call.

 

 

What Will Happen If I Don’t Treat My Periodontal Disease?

Periodontal DiseaseWhat Will Happen If I Don’t Treat My Periodontal Disease?

The prognosis for untreated Periodontal Disease does not have the best outcome. Periodontal Disease not only can affect your teeth and gums but research has found it can affect your overall health as well.  As for your teeth, the beginning stages can cause painful chewing, bleeding gums and bad breath.  Most people believe that if they don’t treat their Periodontal Disease, losing some teeth and having difficulty eating  steak or corn on the cob would be their worst problem. However, that is far from the truth of what this untreated bacterial infection can do to you.  As medicine continues to advance, scientist continue to find supporting evidence of the association between periodontal disease and systemic conditions.  These conditions reach far beyond your teeth and can affect your health in a negative way.

Conditions Such As:

  • cardiovascular disease (heart attack/stroke)
  • type 2 diabetes
  • adverse pregnancy outcomes
  • chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
  • pneumonia
  • chronic kidney disease
  • rheumatoid arthritis
  • cognitive impairment
  • obesity
  • metabolic syndrome
  • cancer

What is Periodontal Disease?

Periodontal Disease is a bacterial infection under your gums.  As with most infections, if you don’t treat it, it will only get worse.  This infection works by breaking down your gums and detaching your gums from your teeth. Over time, once this infection has progressed and has gone untreated, tooth loss will be imminent.

Signs of Periodontal Disease

  • Bad breath that won’t go away
  • Red or swollen gums
  • Tender or bleeding gums
  • Painful chewing
  • Loose teeth
  • Sensitive teeth
  • Receding gums or longer appearing teeth

But there is good news! Periodontal Disease can be prevented and treated.  I know you have been told all through your life that good oral hygiene is important for healthy teeth and gums.  It is true!  Regular brushing and flossing can mitigate your chances of gum disease.  That however is only the first step.  Regular dental check-ups and dental cleanings are important for maintaining a healthy smile.

 

Regular Checkups Can Save you Thousands!

regular checkups can save you money
Regular Checkups Can Save You Thousands
If you have dental problems like tooth decay, gum disease or even oral cancer, regular dental visits give your dentist a chance to catch it early on. That’s key. Because the earlier your dentist diagnoses a problem the easier it is to treat. For example, if you have gum disease and let it go unchecked (and untreated) for too long, you may need extensive — and expensive — gum disease treatment.
Regular dental checkups allow you and your dentist to stay ahead of problems, which can translate into thousands saved.
A professional dental cleaning is also a must because it’s the only way to effectively remove tartar (hardened plaque). Even if you brush and floss regularly, that’s not enough. Besides looking unsightly (tartar is a “stain magnet” and often has a brown or yellowish tint), tartar also contains cavity-causing bacteria. Preventing the need for a mouthful of fillings every year easily adds up to thousands saved in the long run.
Perhaps one of the most important reasons to invest in regular dental exams and cleanings is that it has a positive impact on your overall health. Recent studies have shown that there’s a link between periodontal disease and heart disease; when the former is present, the latter is twice as likely.
According to the American Academy of Periodontology, gum disease can have a domino effect on your health. The bacteria caused by periodontal disease can enter your bloodstream and attach to your heart’s blood vessels, causing dangerous blood clots. Another scenario is that the plaque buildup caused by periodontal disease can cause the heart’s blood vessels to swell.
In this way, regular checkups and cleanings are not only money-saving but life-saving. And that’s priceless.

Why take Care of your Teeth?

 

It Could Affect Your Breathing

Gum disease may increase your risk of getting respiratory infections, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and pneumonia, according to the Journal of Periodontology. The infections might be caused when bacteria from the mouth are inhaled into your lungs, possibly causing your airways to become inflamed.

Come see us at Glasscock Dental .  We want to see you smile!