Tag Archives: dental facts

Dental Facts to Chew on!

Dental Facts to Chew OnDental Facts to Chew On!

Dentistry has come a long way since the beginning of time.  Enclosed is a list of Dental Facts for you and your family to chew on.

  • The number of cavities in the average mouth is down and people are keeping their teeth longer with the advances in dentistry.   People, on average, have healthier mouths than even 10 years ago.
  •  60% of people don’t know that a sore jaw, when combined with chest pain, can signal a heart attack – especially in women.
  • The average American spends 38.5 total days brushing their teeth over a lifetime.
  • The average person only brushes for 45 to 70 seconds a day, the recommended amount of time is 2-3 minutes.
  • More than 300 types of bacteria make up dental plaque.
  • Just like fingerprints, tooth prints are unique to each individual.
  • 32% of Americans cite bad breath as the least attractive trait of their co-workers.
  • Dentists have recommended that a toothbrush be kept at least six (6) feet away from a toilet to avoid airborne particles resulting from the flush.
  • A toothpick is the object most often choked on by Americans
  • Only 40% of  young people age 6 to 19 have experienced their first cavity.  That’s down from 50% a decade ago.
  • Over the last ten years the number of people age 60 who’d lost all their teeth had decreased from 33% to 25%.
  • 44% of dental care expenditures are paid out-of-pocket.
  • It has been estimated that 69 percent of Americans age 35 to 44 have at least one missing tooth, and one in four over the age of 74 have lost ALL their natural teeth.
  • Dental implants are the only dental restoration option that preserves and stimulates natural bone, actually helping to stimulate bone growth and prevent bone loss.
  • More people use blue toothbrushes than red ones.
  • More than 51 million hours of school are lost each year by children due to dental related illness.
  • 94% of Americans say they brush nightly’ 81% say they do it first thing in the morning.
  • People who drink 3 or more sugary sodas daily have 62% more dental decay, fillings and tooth loss.
  • People with red hair are more sensitive to pain and consequently need more anesthetic during operations than other patients. Those with red hair needed 20 percent more anesthetic to numb the pain, according to New Scientist.
  • The enamel on the top surface on your tooth is the hardest part of your entire body.
  • Many diseases are linked to your oral health, including heart disease, osteoporosis, and diabetes.
  • If you get your tooth knocked out, put it in milk and hold it in your mouth—this will help your tooth to survive longer. Make sure you see a dentist right away.
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Are Australian Teeth Healthier?

The case against sugar-sweetened soft drinks is shaping up as a significant new health frontier.

On one side, the drinks industry promotes products as a harmless, fun-filled part of a normal diet.

On the other side, are the health groups whose job it is to warn the public that sugary drinks are fuelling an obesity epidemic that has disastrous implications for general health and risks later-life heart disease and diabetes.

The facts are alarming. One standard soft drink, consumed by most children without a second thought, hides in it 16 teaspoons of sugar. A daily dose of this can lead to a weight gain of more than 6kg a year.

Soft drinks in America are now the largest single source of calories in the US diet, accounting for more than 7 per cent of total daily energy intake.

Australia is not far behind, although they are not quite so hooked on the super-sized drinks that ordinary Americans consume without effort.

In New York, the health lobby has prevailed to the point of restricting the sale of gargantuan sugary drinks that deliver obscene amounts of kilojoules.

Of course anyone intent on over-consuming can and will do so by going to a second outlet and buying another but the message is there.

In Australia there are three leading health groups, the Cancer Council, Diabetes Australia and the National Heart Foundation, that have joined forces to inquire into taxing soft drinks and looking at other American-style restrictions on sales.

western-australia-kangaroo-beach

They are also pushing for government support for a public education campaign to ensure children drink mainly water and low-fat milk – not Coke.

It is widely accepted that it is best not to eat foods in which sugar is the main ingredient; this includes soft drinks, cordials and lollies which are primarily sugar and lack additional nutritional value.

The focus so far has been on the risk to dental health from the frequent consumption of acidic and sugary drinks which are a key factor in the deteriorating dental health of Australian children.

If you or your children indulge in sugary drinks it is important to keep up with routine cleanings.  Contact Glasscock Dental for more information.

8430 Univ. Exec. Park Drive Suite 610 Charlotte, NC 28262