Tag Archives: children

Aesthetic Dentistry Helps Self-Esteem of Children

childrenAesthetic Dentistry Helps Self-Esteem of Children

Children with damaged, discolored or missing teeth sometimes have problems with self-esteem that can be improved through aesthetic dentistry.
When a child has lost one or more front teeth, the dentist can replace these teeth with an aesthetic maintainer. The artificial teeth can be placed onto a removable or cemented dental appliance. Also, dentists can apply aesthetic veneers, or plastic facings, on discolored primary front teeth.
For mildly or moderately decayed front and back teeth, dentists now are able to place tooth-colored dental fillings. These materials have been dramatically improved and eventually, dentists no longer will need to place silver fillings. These tooth-colored fillings are bonded to the tooth surface and they not only are beautiful but strong as well.
For severely decayed front and back teeth, silver-colored dental crowns no longer are the norm. Dentists now have tooth-colored plastic and porcelain materials that can be used to cover the entire surface of the tooth to restore both function and aesthetics. Some of these crowns have metal linings but still have tooth-colored facings that allow for beautiful aesthetic restorations.
Many children benefit dramatically from aesthetic dental care on their primary teeth. Be sure to consult with your dentist if you have questions about whether aesthetic dentistry is right for your child.
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Should Elementary Schools Provide Preventative Dentistry Services?

As California educators struggle to boost student achievement across economic lines, teeth are holding them back.

Hundreds of thousands of low-income children suffering from dental disease, some with teeth rotted to the gum line, are presenting California school districts with a widespread public health problem.

Increasingly, dental health advocates are looking to schools to help solve the crisis. Several school districts, including Oakland Unified, are running innovative programs to provide dental care at no cost to students. Third-party insurers are billed whenever possible, but insurance is not a prerequisite for treatment.

school children at dentist

Meanwhile, a full-service dental clinic opened last year at Peres Elementary School in Richmond’s Iron Triangle neighborhood. The clinic offers everything from applying resin sealant to kids’ teeth — a vital preventive measure to stave off cavities and decay — to fillings and extractions. The West Contra Costa school district hopes to expand the model to other schools.

Dental disease is at “epidemic” levels among California children, according to the U.S. Surgeon General, and low-income children are disproportionately affected. They are 12 times more likely to miss school because of dental problems than children from higher-income families, according to a 2008 report by the Healthy States Initiative, a coalition sponsored by the Council of State Governments to study state health problems.

What’s more, students suffering from toothache tend to have lower grade-point averages than students with healthy teeth.

“The issue is huge,” said Gordon Jackson, director of the state Department of Education’s Coordinated Student Support and Adult Education Division, which oversees health, counseling and other support programs provided at schools. “Tooth decay remains one of the most chronic diseases for children and adolescents. As we’re having the conversation about California’s future and student academic achievement, we have to have a conversation about oral health as well.”

Inside the sleek new student health center at James Madison Middle School in Oakland, dental hygienist Linda G. Cannon has beamed her headlamp into the mouths of hundreds of students from the middle school and nearby Sobrante Park Elementary School.

Two days a week, during the physical education class period or the “sixth period” extra time, students spend about 50 minutes each in the baby-blue dental chair. With the whoosh of the suction tool as a soundtrack, Cannon screens for tooth decay, cleans teeth, applies fluoride varnish, which can help prevent tooth decay, and applies tooth sealant, an effective barrier to cavities, particularly on molars. The clinic doesn’t provide fillings or restorative dentistry to fix severe problems.

The Alameda County Public Health Department and The Atlantic Philanthropies, a New York-based private foundation, fund the dental services.

While Cannon said she’s starting to see signs of improvement in student dental health since the clinic opened in February 2011, the problem persists. “It sometimes looks like they’ve never been to the dentist,” she said.

Of the more than 400 students screened at James Madison in the past two years, nearly three quarters of elementary school students and just over half of middle school students showed signs of tooth decay, Cannon said.

While similar dental care programs operate in other districts, they are still a rarity in the state. Many other districts lack the resources to offer dental care, and still others balk at being asked to provide dental care on top of a rigorous curriculum.

Still, schools have a vested interest in addressing the issue.

Dental problems keep California students out of class an estimated 874,000 days a year, costing schools nearly $30 million in lost attendance based-funding, according to the 2007 California Health Interview Survey, an ongoing statewide survey by the Center for Health Policy Research at UC Los Angeles. The study is still considered the benchmark for children’s oral health.

Would you like to see this in your local Elementary Schools?

For any oral health concerns Contact Glasscock Dental

8430 Univ. Exec. Park Drive Suite 610 Charlotte, NC 28262

Are Australian Teeth Healthier?

The case against sugar-sweetened soft drinks is shaping up as a significant new health frontier.

On one side, the drinks industry promotes products as a harmless, fun-filled part of a normal diet.

On the other side, are the health groups whose job it is to warn the public that sugary drinks are fuelling an obesity epidemic that has disastrous implications for general health and risks later-life heart disease and diabetes.

The facts are alarming. One standard soft drink, consumed by most children without a second thought, hides in it 16 teaspoons of sugar. A daily dose of this can lead to a weight gain of more than 6kg a year.

Soft drinks in America are now the largest single source of calories in the US diet, accounting for more than 7 per cent of total daily energy intake.

Australia is not far behind, although they are not quite so hooked on the super-sized drinks that ordinary Americans consume without effort.

In New York, the health lobby has prevailed to the point of restricting the sale of gargantuan sugary drinks that deliver obscene amounts of kilojoules.

Of course anyone intent on over-consuming can and will do so by going to a second outlet and buying another but the message is there.

In Australia there are three leading health groups, the Cancer Council, Diabetes Australia and the National Heart Foundation, that have joined forces to inquire into taxing soft drinks and looking at other American-style restrictions on sales.

western-australia-kangaroo-beach

They are also pushing for government support for a public education campaign to ensure children drink mainly water and low-fat milk – not Coke.

It is widely accepted that it is best not to eat foods in which sugar is the main ingredient; this includes soft drinks, cordials and lollies which are primarily sugar and lack additional nutritional value.

The focus so far has been on the risk to dental health from the frequent consumption of acidic and sugary drinks which are a key factor in the deteriorating dental health of Australian children.

If you or your children indulge in sugary drinks it is important to keep up with routine cleanings.  Contact Glasscock Dental for more information.

8430 Univ. Exec. Park Drive Suite 610 Charlotte, NC 28262

2 Min 2X a Day Campaign for Children’s Oral Health

Coalition of More Than 35 Leading Dental Organizations Joins Ad Council to Launch First Campaign on Children’s Oral Health

Campaign partners include Sesame Street, DreamWorks Animation, Cartoon Network, MyKazoo!, Grey Group and Wing

http://www.ada.org/7284.aspx

NEW YORK, NY, August 14, 2012 /PRNewswire/ — According to a survey released by the Ad Council today less than half (44%) of parents in the U.S. report that their child brushes their teeth twice a day or more. In time for back-to-school season, the Ad Council is joining The Partnership for Healthy Mouths, Healthy Lives, a coalition of more than 35 leading dental health organizations, to debut Kids’ Healthy Mouths, their first joint national multimedia public service campaign designed to teach parents and caregivers, as well as children, about the importance of oral health and the simple ways in which they can help prevent oral disease. The English and Spanish-language public service ads are being distributed to media outlets nationwide today.

Dental decay is the most common chronic childhood disease with more than 16 million kids suffering from untreated tooth decay in the U.S. The mouth is the gateway to a person’s overall health, and an unhealthy mouth can be associated with obesity, diabetes and even heart disease. In the U.S., oral disease causes kids to miss 51 million school hours and their parents to lose 25 million work hours annually. Additionally, oral disease disproportionately affects children from low-income families and these children have almost twice the number of decayed teeth that have not been treated by a dentist as compared to others in the general population.

Created pro bono by ad agencies Grey Group and Wing in New York, the new Kids’ Healthy Mouths public service campaign is aimed at parents and caregivers throughout the U.S., particularly low-income families, and stresses the importance of brushing for 2 minutes twice a day.

According to the Ad Council survey released today, 60% of parents with children ages 12 or younger report that they do not regularly help their child brush their teeth or check to make sure they’ve done a good job. Additionally, close to one-third (31%) report arguing with their kids at least once a week about brushing their teeth. Parents also report that, on average, their child wastes over two hours each day on things that are silly or unnecessary, such as playing video games, texting, or watching an online video. The new campaign notes that some of this time could instead be focused on improving their oral health.

“The messages in this campaign may seem simple, but their impact will be felt for years to come,” said Gary Price, Secretary and CEO of the Dental Trade Alliance Foundation. “Most mouth disease is preventable using steps that can easily become a part of every child’s life routine. We are proud to be a part of such a broad partnership to help parents and caregivers learn how easy it is to protect their children, give them healthy mouths and help them lead healthy lives.”

The English and Spanish-language TV, radio, print, outdoor and digital PSAs poke fun at the myriad of inane things children spend their time doing and highlight that it only takes 2 minutes, twice a day to help maintain a healthy mouth and prevent future oral pain. An additional English and Spanish-language PSA features Elmo from Sesame Street singing to kids, reminding them to “Brushy Brush” their teeth every day as part of Sesame Street’s Healthy Teeth, Healthy Me campaign. The new campaign also includes a PSA featuring “Tooth” – the Tooth Fairy from Rise of the Guardians, the upcoming film from DreamWorks Animation SKG Inc..

“This is a great opportunity for Sesame Street to continue to use its influence to help families and their children make healthy decisions about oral health,” said Dr. Jeanette Betancourt, Senior Vice President for Outreach and Educational Practices, Sesame Workshop. “We are excited to partner with the Ad Council when nurturing children’s overall development is so critical and the subsequent positive effects can last a lifetime.”

“We are thrilled to work with the Ad Council and support this campaign by helping to convey the importance of oral health,” said Susan Spencer, DreamWorks Animation’s Head of National Promotions and Marketing Services.

All of the PSAs direct parents and caregivers to a new website, 2min2x.org (which is available in English and Spanish, and includes a mobile version), where parents and children can watch entertaining videos and listen to music—all 2 minutes in length—while children are brushing their teeth. Campaign media partners, including Cartoon Network and My Kazoo!, donated snippets of videos and songs for the site. A series of social media strategies will also be implemented to engage parents and children, including messaging on Facebook and Twitter and a dedicated YouTube channel, www.youtube.com/2min2x, where the 2-minute content will be featured.

This campaign is the first in the Ad Council’s 70 year history to address oral health. The Ad Council is distributing the new PSAs to more than 33,000 media outlets nationwide and the ads will air and run in advertising time and space entirely donated by the media. Several media companies have committed to supporting the PSAs prior to their launch.

Bring your children in for a cleaning.  Contact Glasscock Dental for more information.

8430 Univ. Exec. Park Drive Suite 610 Charlotte, NC 28262

Dental Sealants Safe For Children?

Sealants are a great way to help prevent against tooth decay and cavities on your back teeth (molars), especially for Children.   These are the teeth that are most vulnerable to cavities and decay because they are used in the chewing process, and are the most difficult to reach and clean.

Molars first come in at around 5-7 years of age, with a second set coming in between the ages of 11-14. It is best to have a sealant placed when the molars first come in to ensure they are protected early.

To place a sealant, an adhesive is first applied to the teeth. The sealant is then placed over the adhesive as a liquid, as if it is painted right onto the tooth. The liquid then hardens and creates a barrier between your tooth and any plaque, food particles, and bacteria.

In dental circles, the question of sealants has been hotly debated for nearly 50 years, and at least since the ADA awarded the product its seal of approval in 1976. While there have been concerns that the sealants may expose children to the controversial estrogen-like chemical bisphenol A, or BPA, the benefits in preventing kids’ cavities outweigh the risks, the American Dental Association states.

Interested in Sealants? Contact Glasscock Dental for more information.

8430 Univ. Exec. Park Drive Suite 610
Charlotte, NC 28262