Tag Archives: brush

Dental Facts to Chew on!

Dental Facts to Chew OnDental Facts to Chew On!

Dentistry has come a long way since the beginning of time.  Enclosed is a list of Dental Facts for you and your family to chew on.

  • The number of cavities in the average mouth is down and people are keeping their teeth longer with the advances in dentistry.   People, on average, have healthier mouths than even 10 years ago.
  •  60% of people don’t know that a sore jaw, when combined with chest pain, can signal a heart attack – especially in women.
  • The average American spends 38.5 total days brushing their teeth over a lifetime.
  • The average person only brushes for 45 to 70 seconds a day, the recommended amount of time is 2-3 minutes.
  • More than 300 types of bacteria make up dental plaque.
  • Just like fingerprints, tooth prints are unique to each individual.
  • 32% of Americans cite bad breath as the least attractive trait of their co-workers.
  • Dentists have recommended that a toothbrush be kept at least six (6) feet away from a toilet to avoid airborne particles resulting from the flush.
  • A toothpick is the object most often choked on by Americans
  • Only 40% of  young people age 6 to 19 have experienced their first cavity.  That’s down from 50% a decade ago.
  • Over the last ten years the number of people age 60 who’d lost all their teeth had decreased from 33% to 25%.
  • 44% of dental care expenditures are paid out-of-pocket.
  • It has been estimated that 69 percent of Americans age 35 to 44 have at least one missing tooth, and one in four over the age of 74 have lost ALL their natural teeth.
  • Dental implants are the only dental restoration option that preserves and stimulates natural bone, actually helping to stimulate bone growth and prevent bone loss.
  • More people use blue toothbrushes than red ones.
  • More than 51 million hours of school are lost each year by children due to dental related illness.
  • 94% of Americans say they brush nightly’ 81% say they do it first thing in the morning.
  • People who drink 3 or more sugary sodas daily have 62% more dental decay, fillings and tooth loss.
  • People with red hair are more sensitive to pain and consequently need more anesthetic during operations than other patients. Those with red hair needed 20 percent more anesthetic to numb the pain, according to New Scientist.
  • The enamel on the top surface on your tooth is the hardest part of your entire body.
  • Many diseases are linked to your oral health, including heart disease, osteoporosis, and diabetes.
  • If you get your tooth knocked out, put it in milk and hold it in your mouth—this will help your tooth to survive longer. Make sure you see a dentist right away.
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Tips for Breaking Bad Oral Habits

bad habits

Tips for Breaking Bad Oral Habits

Did you know that a lot of little things you do (or don’t do) on a day-to-day basis affect your teeth’s well-being and may fall under a list of bad oral habits? These include not brushing or flossing enough, eating too many sweets too often, or even using your teeth to open a bag of chips.

Bad oral habits die hard, but they can be stopped in their tracks by the following tips:

Floss at least once a day. It helps remove bits of food and dental plaque in places your toothbrush can’t find, helping to keep your gums healthy.

Brush at least twice a day. If brushing is not an option, chew sugarless gum (make sure it’s sugarless!) for 20 minutes after a meal or snack. This helps prevent tooth decay.

Clean your tongue. Regularly cleaning your tongue with a toothbrush or a tongue scraper helps remove the bacteria that causes bad breath.

Replace your toothbrush regularly. Replacing your tooth brush ever 3-4 months is a good idea. Bristles in your toothbrush that are bent and broken don’t do a good job cleaning your teeth.

 Eat a balanced diet. Snacking on sweets without brushing increases the acid in your mouth… and the likelihood of tooth decay. Munch on vegetables and fruit instead.

Regular Dental Visits. Your dentist is trained to do damage control in your mouth before it’s too late. You should visit the dentist regularly — every six months.

Adding these to your list one at a time is a good start to kick those bad oral habits. By doing a little self-check on your daily dental care habits, you can be on your way to making sure your teeth, your mouth’s health and your overall health are at their best.

Dental Care Checklist for Adults

Dental Care check listDental Care Checklist for Adults

Don’t let dental visits slide! Adult life can sometimes be a juggling act and it may feel like you just can’t find the time for a dental visit. But making time for regular dental visits now can help keep you out of the dental office in the future.

Brush and floss daily, even if it’s late. You’ve heard this a million times by now, but the importance of regular brushing and flossing can never be emphasized enough. Even if you’ve been good about your oral hygiene all your life, resist the temptation to let it slide for even one day; the longer plaque stays on your teeth, the more destructive it becomes.

Eat well-balanced meals. When you’re juggling work, home and kids, it can be tempting to turn to fast food, soda and sugary snacks as a way to save time and feel more energetic. But sugar is a tooth decay demon and can cause you to crash after that initial “sugar high.” Be sure to integrate plenty of fresh vegetables into your daily meals and eat fruit, nuts and celery or carrot sticks as snacks.

Exercise regularly — it’s good for your teeth! Studies show that people who maintain a healthy lifestyle — exercise and eating right — are 40 percent less likely to develop advanced gum disease.

Consider treating yourself to cosmetic dentistry. Whether you want a quick boost or a complete smile makeover, there are plenty of cosmetic dental treatments available to help you achieve your dream smile. One-hour laser teeth whitening treatments can make your teeth 8-10 shades whiter, and porcelain veneers can mask stained teeth, chipped teeth or crooked teeth.

How to Choose the Right Electric Tooth Brush

Believe it or not, many school-aged children are now enthusiastic about brushing their teeth. We can thank the invention of the rechargeable electric toothbrush for this happy phenomenon.

Rechargeable electric toothbrushes are easy to use—that’s part of their appeal. And although a rechargeable electric toothbrush costs more than a manual toothbrush, it may be worth it if your child (or you) is more enthusiastic about using it.

Most rechargeable electric toothbrushes operate at anywhere from 5,000 to 30,000 strokes on your teeth per minute, and because of this, it takes less time to do a thorough job. Some rechargeable electric toothbrushes have even more power—Oral B’s Professional Care 7000 series of rechargeable electric toothbrushes rotates 40,000 times per minute.

To use a rechargeable electric toothbrush, just place toothpaste on the brush head and hold the brush at a 45-degree angle, just as you would a manual toothbrush. Then turn on the rechargeable electric and move the brush from tooth to tooth. The smaller heads of most rechargeable electric toothbrushes usually brush about one tooth at a time, depending on the size of your teeth. Guide the electric brush along the front surfaces, back surfaces, and chewing surfaces of each tooth.

Even with a rechargeable electric toothbrush, you should spend about two minutes brushing to ensure that you’ve cleaned each tooth. When you’ve finished brushing, simply rinse the brush head with water and allow it to dry.

If you are looking for the perfect electric toothbrush, Target has a great buying guide

Spin through the options. Discover why you’ll never brush the same.

  • Timers.
    Most electric toothbrushes have a 2-minute timer (dentists recommend 2 minutes every morning and night) that beeps or shuts off the toothbrush when you’re done. shop all toothbrushes with timers
  • Quad pacers.
    Think of your mouth in quadrants: top right, lower right, top left, lower left. Quad pacers beep every 30 seconds to send you to the next quadrant. They remind you to brush more thoroughly and give each
    section its time.
  • Sensitivity & modes.
    An electric toothbrush is often great for people with sensitive teeth. Some brushes even feature a gentle brushing mode, while others have multiple modes (high-speed, quick clean, polishing). shop multiple brush modes shop high-speed toothbrushes
  • Ultraviolet sanitizers.
    What lurks within your bristles isn’t pretty, but can be killed by ultraviolet light. Ultraviolet sanitizers are built into some brushes’ charger bases to keep your brush head free of bacteria and viruses. shop all ultraviolet sanitizing toothbrushes
  • Rechargeability.
    Most electric toothbrushes are rechargeable, come with a charging stand, and run between 1 and 3 weeks on a full charge. Lights often indicate when the battery is done charging or needs a recharge. shop rechargeable toothbrushes
  • Gums & pressure.
    For healthier gums, toothbrushes may have a massage mode that stimulates the gums, or a gentle mode for sensitive gums. Others feature a pressure sensor that shuts off when you’re brushing too hard. shop multiple brush modes
  • Travel.
    Even if you travel occasionally, a storage case is nice for keeping your brush clean and protected. World travelers or non-typical users might consider electric brushes that take external AA batteries or come with multivoltage chargers.