Tag Archives: bacteria

Red Wine is Good!

red wine and your teeth

 

Now really… Who doesn’t love that glass of wine with dinner?  I know. Your thinking its not the best choice. A refreshing glass of water with dinner would be the best choice for my teeth. (sad face)

Today, the tides have turned!  Let me give you a good reason to have that glass of wine and indulge in all its red grapey goodness.  A study published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry has shown that the  compounds in red wine can prevent cavities and plaque build-up.  Red wine and grape seed extract contain antimicrobial elements that were found to help kill bacteria in simulated lab tests.

To test their theory, a  study, lead by an authority of wine chemistry from Spain, tested multiple apparatuses with bacteria associated with dental plaque.  The findings concluded that, “Red wine with or without alcohol and wine with grape seed extract were the most effective at getting rid of the bacteria that develops cavities and subsequent tooth loss that affects an estimated 60 to 90 percent of the global population.”

Many different studies are finding that there are many health benefits associated with drinking a glass of red wine.  Ah, but with anything good there is always the bad side.  Red Wine does in fact stain your teeth and consuming large amounts of alcohol has serious adverse effects on your overall health.  As with anything, moderation is the key.

Address:
8430 Univ. Exec. Park Drive Suite 610
Charlotte, NC 28262
Telephone:

704-510-1150

 Email:smile@glasscockdental.com
Business Hours
Monday: 8 a.m.- 5 p.m.
Tuesday: 8 a.m.- 5 p.m.
Wednesday: 8 a.m.- 5 p.m.
Thursday: 7:30 a.m.- 2 p.m.
Friday: 8 a.m.- 2 p.m. – Every Other Week
Saturday: Closed
Sunday: Closed

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/277305.php

http://www.indianwineacademy.com/item_2_604.aspx

http://www.nydailynews.com/life-style/health/red-wine-fight-cavities-article-1.1802473

 

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Obesity and Tooth Decay Go Hand-in-Hand?

obesity and tooth decay

Obesity is truly becoming a plague affecting the entire planet.  It is a condition caused when the body collects too much body fat.  This condition causes a person to be unhealthy which in turn can cause various diseases as well as premature death.  The truth of the matter is obesity is preventable.  One out of every 3 people in the United States is affected with this horrible affliction and the problem continues to grow.

What causes obesity?

  • Eating more food than your body can use
  • Drinking too much alcohol
  • Not getting enough exercise
  • Biology

So how does that affect your teeth?

Eating foods with lots of calories tend to have lots of sugar. The combination of bacteria and food causes tooth decay.   The more times you eat, the more bacteria is present in your mouth feeding on your teeth.   As the bacteria feed on the sugars in the food you eat, they make acids. The acids attack the teeth for 20 minutes or more after eating. Over a period of time, these acids destroy tooth enamel, resulting in tooth decay.

Researchers from the University of Washington School of Dentistry suggest there may be a connection between a high glycemic diet and dental disease.  In other words, the high amounts of sugar found in processed foods, refined flour, rice and other products produce the bacteria that turns to acid and attack your teeth after eating.  These sugars turn into plaque on your teeth and when not removed contribute to tooth decay, gingivitis, gum disease and periodontitis. 

How do you Prevent this from Happening?

The answer is simple really.  Regular check-ups to the dentist and a healthy balanced diet enriched with water fresh fruits, vegetables, healthy proteins and whole grains.

 

Address:
8430 Univ. Exec. Park Drive Suite 610
Charlotte, NC 28262
Telephone:

704-510-1150

Fax:

704-510-1220

 

 

 

 

Why you Need to Brush your Teeth Before Bed

brushing teeth before bed

Brushing your teeth before bed might sound like an insignificant choir to worry about but it can have a significant impact on your oral health.  Recently, a survey conducted by the British Dental Health Foundation found that many people skip brushing their teeth before bed. The poll’s results showed that 47 percent of respondents regularly skip this nighttime ritual, Medical News Today reported. That is almost 1 out of every 2 people not brushing!

teeth bacteria

Why Brushing Before Bed Time is Essential

Your mouth is a breading ground for bacteria.  Bacteria accumulates on your teeth, gums and tongue.  As a matter of fact, you have more bacteria in your mouth than cells in your body. The bacteria in our mouths need food to live and multiply. So when we eat foods (especially sugary foods), or even starchy foods like pasta or breads, the bacteria use them as their food. The bacteria then produce acids that can dissolve tooth enamel.   When left over night, more extensive damage can be done to your gums and teeth based on the amount of time the bacteria is given to grow. Proper brushing(teeth, gums and tongue) and flossing, help to eliminate excess bacteria from your mouth.

Our advice to you? Brush your teeth before bed!  You can save yourself a toothache and a good chance of gingivitis in your future.  It’s only takes 2 minutes before bed which can save you lot’s of money and time to fix later down the line.

Address:
8430 Univ. Exec. Park Drive Suite 610
Charlotte, NC 28262
Telephone:

704-510-1150

Fax:

704-510-1220

The Common Cold and Your Toothbrush

toothbrush

As time has passed, people have become better informed on the prevention and contraction of viruses and bacteria.  Hygiene, hand washing, proper sleep and healthy eating are essential to ensure a healthy body and best defense against viruses and bacteria that can attack your body.

The “Common Cold”, as its name implies, is the most common virus to infect the  human body.   Children infected by this virus usually become sicker than most adults and are more prone to develop a complication, such as an ear infection.

Common Symptoms of the “Common Cold”

  • Runny or stuffy nose
  • Itchy or sore throat
  • Cough
  • Congestion
  • Slight body aches or a mild headache
  • Sneezing
  • Watery eyes
  • Low-grade fever
  • Mild fatigue

What do you do about your toothbrush after being sick?   This has been a long debated question.  It is said, that after contracting the “Common Cold” your body builds up antibodies to fight the virus and lower your chances of re-infection.   Other’s debate that your mouth has the most bacteria in your whole body.  The virus lives on your toothbrush and could possibly re-infect you and anyone who might come in contact with your toothbrush incidentally by sharing toothbrush holders, etc.  Bacteria however, like strep throat, will re-infect you and your toothbrush should be thrown away and replaced after you get better.

So what is the right answer to the toothbrush dilemma? Well, that is up to you.  The office of Dr. David M. Glasscock, DDS believes to err on the side of caution and recommends the toothbrush be replaced after recouping from any virus or bacteria.  As quoted by the infamous Benjamin Franklin, “An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.”

Address:
8430 Univ. Exec. Park Drive Suite 610
Charlotte, NC 28262
Telephone:

704-510-1150

Fax:

704-510-1220