Category Archives: Glasscock Dental

July Vacation Schedule

vacation

My office will be closed on the following dates;

July 1st-July 12th

If you are having a true dental emergency while the office is closed, please contact Dr. Bullard’s office at 704-503-1800.

Also, administrative staff will be available part-time during these dates to schedule appointments or to answer any questions you may have while the office is closed.

Thank you,

Dr. David Glasscock

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Warning Signs of an Impacted Wisdom Tooth

impacted wisdom tooth

Somewhere between the ages of 18-24 your wisdom teeth begin to erupt.   Depending on how these teeth come in will depend if they need to be removed.  It’s not necessary for you to get your wisdom teeth removed if they are correctly positioned in your mouth and do not cause any pain or dental problems. However, 85 percent of adults have their wisdom teeth removed to protect their over all oral health.  Unfortunately, the eruption of wisdom teeth can be a painful experience that disrupts your daily life.

Common Symptoms of Impacted Wisdom Teeth

Swollen gums that are tender and bleeding

An impacted wisdom tooth can make your gums swollen and tender to the touch.  They may even start to bleed.  This can make brushing and flossing feel like an impossible task.  As other dental issues can create the same symptoms, it is important to make an appointment with your dentist to have the situation evaluated.

Swollen Glands

Many times swollen glands accompany impacted wisdom teeth.  Most times these glands are located in your shoulders and neck area.

Pain in the back of the mouth

An impacted tooth or teeth can cause you an immense amount of pain.  As the tooth or teeth that are impacted continue to try and erupt, your pain and symptoms can become worse.  The pain should be at its worse towards the back of the mouth but could in fact radiate down your jaw.  The best way to diagnose a suspected emerging wisdom tooth is to visit your dentist.

Swelling around jaw

With swelling of your gums, many times impacted wisdom teeth can cause your jaw to swell.  As the symptoms progress, your mouth may become difficult to open.

What happens if you ignore the problem?

I highly recommend that you do not ignore the problem.  When impacted wisdom teeth are not removed, there could be complications.  Impacted teeth can force other teeth out of place.  They also can cause infection.  Impacted wisdom teeth are prone to infection and decay so left untreated you could be looking at a serious problem down the line.

We encourage you to contact-us via phone or email. Please use the email below to contact us via email.  If you have any questions or comments, please feel free to get in touch. We’re always happy to hear from you!

Address:
8430 Univ. Exec. Park Drive Suite 610
Charlotte, NC 28262
Telephone:

704-510-1150

Email:smile@glasscockdental.com
Business Hours
Monday: 8 a.m.- 5 p.m.
Tuesday: 8 a.m.- 5 p.m.
Wednesday: 8 a.m.- 5 p.m.
Thursday: 7:30 a.m.- 2 p.m.
Friday: 8 a.m.- 2 p.m. – Every Other Week
Saturday: Closed
Sunday: Closed

What’s Up With Morning Breath?

whats-up-with-morning-breathHave you ever woken up in the morning snuggling with your significant other?  Waking up happy, relaxed and comfortable as reality begins to roll back in ?   As you’re thinking, “How could life be any better?”, when a devastating new thought pops in your head.  The reality of your offensive morning breath rushes to the front of your thoughts.  Now that could be an ugly end to a perfect moment.  Being careful to keep your mouth shut, you hurry to the bathroom to begin your morning ritual. Sound familiar?

Why Do We Have Morning Breath?

The big question is why do we have morning breath?   The main reason for morning breath is from a lack of saliva. When we sleep, saliva production slows down.  Saliva is what is needed to wash away bacteria, food particles and acids from your mouth and teeth.  As your mouth begins getting dryer, bacteria flourish, causing bad breath to increase.

What Makes Morning Breath Worse?

Everyone has a degree of bad breath when they wake.  The degree of your morning breath can be affected by many things.

Mouth Breathers are susceptible to bad breath.  When your mouth is open, it becomes very dry causing the bacteria in the mouth to flourish.  This happening over an 8 hour period can make for a foul smell come morning.

Many medications cause dry mouth. Medications such as Aleve or Advil Cold and Sinus, Benadryl, Lipitor Tabs or Omeprazole can cause your mouth to become more dry. If you are a person using one of these medications, you might be affected by dry mouth which will in turn increase morning breath.

Another indicator of excessive morning breath is a person with gingivitis or periodontal disease.  These conditions indicate that food, plaque and bacteria has entered underneath the gums.  As saliva production reduces, this condition will intensify a persons morning breath.

How Do You Reduce Morning Breath?

There is not much that can be done to eliminate bad breath in the morning but it can be made better.  Brushing and flossing your teeth before bed is important for removing excess bacteria from your teeth. As we mentioned, bacteria flourishes in a dry environment.  Removing as much food particles and bacteria from your mouth before bed will help the problem.   The use of a tongue scraper at bedtime is also helpful as it too will eliminate bacteria from your tongue.  Drinking a glass of water at bedtime is also helpful.  Keeping your body hydrated is good for your health and well as your teeth.

Why Do I Need a Deep Dental Cleaning?

why-do-i-need-a-deep-cleaning

Why Do I Need a Deep Dental Cleaning?

Sometimes we avoid going to the dentist as often as we should.   You can make all kinds of excuses ( lack of time, fear of the dentist, unable to get time off from work ) but when all is said and done, lack of maintenance of your teeth can be a costly mistake not only for your health but your pocket as well.   The consequence for  avoiding those much needed dental visits and cleanings can leave you dealing with gum disease and cavities which could have been prevented.

What Causes Gum Disease?

Over time,  plaque builds up on your teeth.  The bacteria in plaque causes gums to become inflamed and easy to bleed if not removed.  As the plaque and bacteria on your teeth increases, pockets begin to form in areas where the gum has began to pull away from the tooth.  These pockets leave more room for plaque and bacteria to build increasing the damage to the gums and depth of the pocket.  As the damage to the gums increases, the onset of gum disease begins.

How to Correct Gum Disease Once It Has Began

To correct the problem and return your gums to a healthy state, a deep cleaning is needed.  To determined if a deep cleaning is needed,  your dentist or hygienist will probe your teeth and determine if you have periodontal pockets 4 millimeters or greater in your gums.  Only the areas with periodontal pockets 4 millimeters or greater will need a deep cleaning (scaling or root planing) to return your gums to a healthy state.

What is a Deep Cleaning ( Root Planning or Scaling)?

A deep cleaning is when your hygienist needs to remove bacteria, tartar and plaque from below your gum line.  A regular cleaning  requires removing plaque and tartar from above the gum line.  Since the deep cleaning (Root Planning or Scaling) is more invasive, this procedure is performed using a local anesthetic for numbing.  While having this procedure done, Glasscock Dental highly recommends using Arestin along with your deep cleaning treatment.  Arestin is an antibiotic to treat the bacteria under your gums.  The antibiotic will last under your gums for approximately 90 days which will help your gums heal better than without it.

Recovery From Your Deep Cleaning

As with any more invasive treatments, it isn’t unusual to experience some tenderness or discomfort.  Discomfort typically won’t last more than 24 hours and can be treated with over-the-counter pain relievers.

 

 

 

 

Avoiding the Baby Bottle Blues

avoiding the baby bottle bluesAvoiding the Baby Bottle Blues

When it comes to thumb sucking, babies are naturals — maybe because they practice even before they are born. Children begin sucking on their thumb while in the womb to develop the skills necessary for breastfeeding. Not surprisingly swapping a thumb for a pacifier or baby bottle is an easy transition for many kids.
In a child’s first few years, pacifier use generally doesn’t cause problems. But constant, long-term pacifier use, especially once permanent teeth come in, can lead to dental complications. Constant sucking can cause top front teeth to slant out, and bottom front teeth to tilt in. It also can lead to jaw misalignment (such as an overbite) and a narrowing of the roof of the mouth.
It is generally advised that children stop or drastically reduce their pacifier use around age 3. If a child is dependent on the pacifier to be calmed and soothed, try giving it to him or her only when absolutely necessary and using positive reinforcement to wean them off the habit.
Many children also use a baby bottle longer than necessary. Apart from the risks associated with the sucking motion, bottles also carry a heavy risk of promoting tooth decay if they contain anything other than water.
Frequently sucking or sipping on milk or juice from a bottle over an extended period of time will increase your child’s risk of tooth decay. When sugars and carbohydrates come in consistent contact with teeth they create an environment for decay-causing bacteria to thrive. Tooth decay can lead to painful infection and in extreme cases children may need to have a tooth extraction or dental treatment to extensively repair damaged teeth.
Long-term use of pacifiers and bottles can lead to speech and dental problems as your child gets older. Since children develop at different ages, it is a good idea to speak with your dentist and pediatrician to make sure that your infant or toddler’s early oral habits don’t cause problems.

Is it Snoring or Sleep Apnea?

snoring or sleep apnea

Is It Snoring or Sleep Apnea?

About 80 million people in North America snore, and approximately 12 million Americans have sleep apnea. So what’s the difference, and why does it matter?

Snoring is caused by the vibration of the soft palate and uvula, occurring when the airway becomes obstructed during sleep. Several things can obstruct the airway and cause you to snore, including allergies, drinking before bed, being overweight and having large tonsils or a deviated septum.
If you snore now and then, you probably have nothing to worry about. But chronic snoring can be a sign of sleep apnea, a more serious sleep disorder. People with sleep apnea stop breathing in their sleep – sometimes up to 100 hundred times an hour – for one minute or longer. Left untreated, sleep apnea can increase your chances of serious health conditions like high blood pressure and heart disease. At a minimum, you may feel groggy in the morning or unable to concentrate during the day.
The good news is sleep apnea is treatable. The two most common ways to treat sleep apnea are continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy, which is administered by a physician, and oral appliance therapy, which is administered by a dentist. CPAP therapy can be very effective for people with sleep apnea, but some find it difficult to sleep with a mask. More people are increasingly turning to the oral appliances administered by dentists. Oral appliances are small, flexible devices that look like mouthguards. They increase the airway space and reduce air velocity and soft tissue vibration (snoring) by moving the lower jaw into a forward position. Patients who have tried both say that oral appliances are more comfortable to wear, easier to care for and very cost-effective.

Are your Gums Receding or Extra Sensitive?

gum grafting

Gum Grafts: Stick It to Receding Gums

Take a look at your gums. Do they look like they’re receding or do they feel extra sensitive lately? If yes, it’s time to come in for a visit. Receding gums are a sign of two things: gum disease or overly aggressive brushing. Left untreated, gum disease can lead to tooth loss and even heart disease. For early stages of gum disease, we can use a non-surgical scaling and root planing (SRP) treatment to get your gums healthy again. Excessive gum recession, however, sometimes requires a surgical treatment called a gum graft.
Once your gums start to recede, brushing with a lighter hand will only be effective if there is still adequate gum tissue left to act as a barrier from disease and bone loss. But if your gums have receded to the extent that your tooth roots are exposed, you may need a gum graft. Exposed tooth roots can cause varying degrees of tooth sensitivity or make your teeth appear longer than normal. But more importantly, exposed tooth roots can leave your teeth vulnerable to bacteria and periodontal disease.
Gum grafts may also be used to correct a high frenum attachment. The frenum is the muscle between the upper or lower front teeth; if it pulls on the gum margin, recession could result. Orthodontic therapies can also stretch the gum line and cause the gums to recede. In all cases, gum grafts are an excellent way to protect the underlying bone and prevent the gums from receding further.